Biology, M.S.

Department

Department of Biology

Alejandro Calderon-Urrea, Chair
Science Building, Room 106
559.278.2001
FAX: 559.278.3963
www.fresnostate.edu/biology

Degrees and Programs Offered

BS in Biology, B.S.
CERT in Biotechnology, Certificate of Adv. Study
CRED in Professional Clear Foundation Level General Science
CRED in Single Subject Credential - Biological Science
MBT in Biotechnology, M.Bt.
MN in Biology, Minor
MS in Marine Science, M.S.
MS in Biology, M.S.

The Department of Biology offers a diversified undergraduate program that matches the breadth and excitement of modern biology and prepares students for the hundreds of career opportunities that use biology as a foundation. The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded to those students who successfully complete the biology core and additional requirements and electives.

The biology major we offer has three programmatic goals:

  1. To provide students with a solid foundation in all aspects of modern biology and also the intellectual skills that will serve as the basis for a lifetime of future achievement.
  2. To provide students with the specialized educational opportunities that will allow them to compete successfully for careers in the biological sciences or for advanced studies in major doctoral programs.
  3. To provide preprofessional students with the knowledge needed for advanced study in the many fields that build upon a biological foundation.

Our undergraduate biology major is excellent preparation for graduate programs in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, optometry, doctoral programs, and many others.

The department offers a Master of Science in biology for qualified students who wish to explore some part of biology in greater depth. It can be integrated with a postbaccalaureate certificate in biotechnology.
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Facilities

The department is housed in a well-equipped, modern science building. Among the specialized equipment and technologies available for students are DNA sequencers; Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) thermocyclers; apparati for conducting molecular and immunological analysis of nucleic acids and proteins; genetic recombination, including use of electroporation and gene guns; a bioinformatics computing laboratory; a proteomics work station; cell and tissue culture facilities; fermenters and bioreactors; fluorescence, confocal and 4-D microscopes; ultracentrifugation; radioactive materials methodologies; and metabolic studies on all types of life forms. Excellent greenhouse and animal care facilities, as well as media/reagent production complexes, support the instructional and research programs.

Fresno's proximity to both the Sierra Nevada and the Pacific coast provides a natural laboratory with numerous field trip opportunities that are rarely equaled at other institutions. High Sierra, Mediterranean, desert, foothill, coastal, and forest environments are all within a three-hour drive of the campus. The department maintains a wealth of field equipment to observe and collect wild organisms. A self-contained pond ecosystem offers a unique, on-campus study resource. The department also maintains extensive collections of museum specimens of insects, vertebrates and a herbarium. The department is a member of a consortium that manages and operates the Moss Landing Marine Laboratory (MLML). Students can study and conduct research at MLML, located on the Monterey Bay.

Courses

Biology

BIOL 1A. Introductory Biology

Course one of two-semester sequence required of all biology majors. Thematic introduction to the unifying concepts of life science: chemical basis of life; cellular processes; energy metabolism; genetics; evolution. G.E. Breadth B2. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Formerly BIOSC 1A) (Course fee, $15)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: B2

BIOL 1B. Introductory Biology

First-time enrollees must take BIOL 1BL concurrently. Course two of a two-semester sequence required of all biology majors. Continuation of thematic introduction to the unifying concepts of life science: classification and diversity of life; survey of the living organisms; physiology; ecology and environmental biology. (3 lecture hours) (Formerly BIOSC 1B).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 1BL. Introductory Biology Laboratory

First-time enrollees must take BIOL 1B concurrently. Required of all biology majors. Continuation of thematic introduction to the unifying concepts of life scienec: Laboratory exercises in evolution, classification and diversity of life; survey of the living organisms; physiology; ecology and environmental biology. (6 lab hours) (Course fee, $15) (Formerly BIOSC 1B)

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 10. Life Science

Not open to students with credit in BIOL 1A. How living things work and why they work that way. Biology from chemical and physical foundations to ecological and evolutionary processes. Biology and its relationship to human affairs. G.E. Breadth B2. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Course fee, $5)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: B2

BIOL 11. Plant Biology

Not open to students with credit in BIOL 1B (formerly BIOSC 1B). Structure, function, and development of plants. G.E. Breadth B2. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Formerly BOT 10) (Course fee, $15)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: B2

BIOL 12. Animal Biology

Not open to students with credit in BIOL 1B. Structural and functional comparison of animals; principles and human implications of inheritance, evolution, and ecology; physiology as applied to man. G.E. Breadth B2. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Formerly ZOOL 10)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: B2

BIOL 20. Introductory Microbiology

Not open to students with credit in BIOL 120. Prerequisites: CHEM 1A or CHEM 3A. Introduction to microbiology; principles and selected applications. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $25) (Formerly MICRO 20)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 33. Human Anatomy and Physiology

Three units allowed for students with prior credit in human anatomy; 2 units allowed for students with prior credit in human physiology. An integrated study of the structure and function of the human body. (4 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $25) (Formerly PHYAN 33)

Units: 5
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 64. Functional Human Anatomy

Not open to students with credit in BIOL 33. Primarily for students in the health related and biological professions. The life continuum from conception to death. A systems approach to the gross and microscopic structures of the human body. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $25) (Formerly PHYAN 64)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 65. Human Physiology

Not open to students with credit in BIOL 33. College chemistry and human anatomy recommended. Homeostasis in the human body; how organ systems function to maintain life; dynamic and adaptive systems at the molecular, cellular, and organ level. (4 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Formerly PHYAN 65)

Units: 5
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 101. General Ecology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B; PSYCH 42 or MATH 101, or EES 178 (EES majors only). MATH 70 or equivalent recomended. Required of all biology majors. The structure, function, organization, and regulation of populations, communities, and ecosystems. The role of evolution in environmental relationships. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours)* (Formerly BIOSC 130) (Course fee, $15)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 102. Genetics

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B. Co-requisites: CHEM 8 or CHEM 128A. Required of all biology majors. Fundamentals of inheritance, including an introduction to the underlying molecular mechanisms. (3 lecture hours) (Formerly BIOSC 140A)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 103. Cellular Biology

Prerequisites: BIOL 102 and either CHEM 150 or CHEM 155. Fundamentals of inheritance and cellular biology for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, including an introduction to the underlying molecular mechanisms. (3 lecture hours) (Formerly BIOSC 140B)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 104. Genetics and Cell Biology Lab

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 and BIOL 103 (BIOL 103 may be taken concurrently.) Required of all biology majors. Must be taken a minimum of four semesters from completing BIOL 103. Basic techniques in molecular genetics and cell biology. No credit if BIOSC 140B taken prior to fall 2005. (3 lab hours) (Course fee, $20) (Formerly BIOSC 140L lab)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 105. Evolution

Prerequisites: senior standing or permission of instructor; BIOL 101, BIOL 102, and BIOL 103. Required of all biology majors. Evolutionary processes and patterns. Satisfies the senior major requirement for the B.S. in Biology. (Formerly BIOSC 180)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 110. Human Ecology

The study of the relationships between humans and their environment, both natural and man-made; emphasis on scientific understanding of root causes of current environmental problems. (Formerly BIOL 105)

Units: 3

BIOL 120. Microbiology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A, BIOL 1B; CHEM 8 or CHEM 128A; or BIOL 11 and CHEM 150. Emphasis on prokaryotes (bacteria); microbial physiology, genetics, ecology, classification, and identification; applications of microbiology. Prerequisite to most upper-division microbiology courses. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $25) (Formerly MICO 140)

Units: 4

BIOL 121. Medical Microbiology

Prerequisite: BIOL 120; BIOL 157 recommended. The role of microorganisms in causing infection and disease; strategies for diagnosing and treating infections. (3 lecture hours) (Formerly MICRO 183)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 122. Nonvascular Plants

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B or permission of instructor. Comparative structure and phylogeny of the fungi, algae, mosses, and liverworts. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $20) (Formerly BOT 132)

Units: 3

BIOL 123. Phycology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B or permission of instructor. Morphology, cytology, ecology, physiology, economic importance, and cultivation of the algae. (2 lecture, 6 lab or field hours) (Course fee, $30) * (Formerly BOT 142)

Units: 4

BIOL 124. Vascular Plants

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B or permission of instructor. Morphology, reproduction, and evolution of the major groups of vascular plants (both living and extinct). Emphasis placed upon the seed plants. (2 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Formerly BOT 131)

Units: 4

BIOL 125. Plant Taxonomy

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and 1B or permission of instructor. Principles of plant classification; local flora. (1 lecture, 6 lab or field hours) (Formerly BOT 144)

Units: 3

BIOL 130. Invertebrate Zoology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A, BIOL 1B. Systematics and phylogeny (based primarily upon external and internal anatomy) and general ecology of free-living invertebrates (excluding insects). Includes field studies of marine and occasionally freshwater habitats. (2 lecture, 6 lab or field hours) (Course fee, $25) * (Formerly ZOOL 141)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 131. Parasitology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A, BIOL 1B and CHEM 1A or CHEM 3A. A study of the biology of parasitic organisms, including those of humans. Lecture topics: life history strategies, infectious processes, epidemiology, ecology, parasite evolution and phylogeny, diagnosis and treatment. Laboratory and field exercises: identification and samplin techniques, taxanomy, investigation of biological processes. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours*) (cOURSE FEE, $20) (Formerly ZOOL 148)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 132. General Entomology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A, BIOL 1B. Anatomy, physiology, life history, and classification of insects and other arthropods. (2 lecture, 3 lab or field hours)* (Formerly ZOOL 120)

Units: 3

BIOL 133. Natural History of Vertebrates

Prerequisite: BIOL 101. Systematics, distribution, morphology, behavior, and ecology of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Fieldwork includes capture and sampling techniques, species identification and habitat analysis, and may require weekend field trips to coastal, desert,a nd mountain environments. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours)* (Formerly ZOOL 150)

Units: 4

BIOL 134. Ichthyology

Prerequisite: BIOL 101. Ecology, evolution, and diversity of the fish of the world with emphasis on California fish, freshwater and marine. (2 lecture, 3 lab or field hours)* (Formerly ZOOL 171)

Units: 3

BIOL 135. Biology of Reptiles and Birds

Prerequisite: BIOL 101. Ecology, ethology, and evolution of the reptiles and birds of the world. Encompasses the traditional areas of herpetology and ornithology. (3 lecture, 3 lab or field hours) (Course fee, $25) * (Formerly ZOOL 174)

Units: 4

BIOL 136. Mammalogy

Prerequisite: BIOL 101. Ecology, evolution, and diversity of the mammals of the world. (2 lecture, 3 lab or field hours)* (Formerly ZOOL 177)

Units: 3

BIOL 140. Plant Anatomy

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B or permission of instructor. Structure and development of flowering plants at the cellular and tissue levels. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Formerly BOT 133)

Units: 3

BIOL 141. Histology

Prerequisites: BIOL 103. Identification and study of vertebrate cells, tissues, and organs. (2 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Formerly PHYAN 134)

Units: 4

BIOL 142. Vertebrate Embryology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B. Morphogenesis of vertebrates from gamete formation through organogenesis, including physiological and experimental aspects of development. Laboratory emphasis on frog, chick, and pig. (2 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Formerly PHYAN 135)

Units: 4

BIOL 143. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A, BIOL 1B. Comparative structure of vertebrate organ systems; laboratory study of representative vertebrates. (2 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Formerly ZOOL 132) (Class fee, $30)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 144. Neuroanatomy

Prerequisites: BIOL 33 or BIOL 64 or BIOL 65. Macroscopic and microscopic study of the structure and functional relationships of the human nervous system. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Formerly PHYAN 130)

Units: 4

BIOL 150. Molecular Biology

Prerequisites: BIOL 102; BIOL 103; CHEM 150 or CHEM 155. The study of genome structure and fluidity, prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene expression, and genomics. If GENET 142 was taken prior to Fall 2005, it is equivalent to BIOL 150 and BIOL 151 (formerly GENET 143). (3 lecture hours) (Formerly GENET 142)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 151. Bioinformatics

Prerequisite: BIOL 102; and BIOL 103; CHEM 150 or 155. Recommended pre- or co-requisite, BIOL 150. Practical use and application of computational tools for the analysis nucleic acids and proteins. Genomic database searching. Sequence alignment, molecular phylogenetic analysis, secondary and tertiary structure modeling of biological macromolecules. No credit if GENET 142 was taken prior to Fall 2005. (1 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $10) (Formerly GENET 143)

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 152. Experimental Molecular Genetics

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 and BIOL 103. The nature of genetic information, its mutation, transfer, and recombination in cells. (2 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Course fee, $30) (Formerly GENET 171)

Units: 4

BIOL 153. Microbial Genetics

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 and BIOL 120 or permission of instructor. Genetic variation, gene transfer, and regulation of gene expression in model microbial systems and medically and industrically important microbes. ( 3 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Formerly GENET 182)

Units: 4

BIOL 155. Developmental Biology

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 and BIOL 103. Investigations concerning the variety of mechanisms acting during the several stages of development of the living organism, from gamete formation to morphological and biochemical differentiation of organ systems; emphasis on different genetic control. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $20) (Formerly GENET 172)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 156. Plant Growth and Development

Prerequisites: BIOL 102 or permission of instructor. Processes involved in plant growth with emphasis on the development of form in higher plants and the experimental approach. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $20) (Formerly BOT 137)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 157. Immunology

Prerequisites: BIOL 102 required; BIOL 103 and CHEM 150 or CHEM 155 highly recommended. Principles of mammalian immune response, featuring the molecular and cellular interactions involved in both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Regulatory controls and adverse clinical conditions involving immune functions are addresses. Experimental basis of inquiry is emphasized. (Formerly PHYAN 160)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 157L. Immunology Laboratory

Prerequisites: BIOL 157 and either BIOL 103 and BIOL 104 or BIOL 120 (formerly MICRO 140). Experimental illustration of immune response; classical and contemporary immunology techniques; interpretation and presentation of experimental outcomes. (6 lab hours, 1 hour discussion) (Course fee, $30) (Formerly PHYAN 160L)

Units: 3

BIOL 160. Microbial Physiology

Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Structure, function, energy metabolism, growth, and regulatory mechanisms of microorganisms. (2 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Course fee, $25) (Formerly MICO 161)

Units: 4

BIOL 161. Plant Physiology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B (or BIOL 11); CHEM 1A or CHEM 3A; CHEM 3B or CHEM 8 or CHEM 128A; or permission of instructor. General metabolism (photosynthesis, water relations, respiration, nutrient use, etc.) of plants and functional integration with structure. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $20) (Formerly BOT 130)

Units: 4

BIOL 162. Comparative Animal Physiology

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 and BIOL 103. Evolution of physiological systems; functional adaptations to different environments; physiological principles as applied to animals. (3 lecture) (Formerly PHYAN 151 lecture)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 162L. Comparative Animal Physiology Lab

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 and BIOL 103. BIOL 162 is a pre- or co-requisite. Comparative experimental approach to understanding how animals adapt to different environmental challenges and investigations into physiological processes. (3 lab hours) (Course fee, $20) (Formerly PHYAN 151 Lab component)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 163. Advanced Human Physiology

Prerequisites: BIOL 103 and either BIOL 65 or equivalent. Primarily for students in biology and in the health professions. Advanced study of the cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory, and digestive systems. Concepts explaining normal functioning will be illustrated through study of specific examples, such as exercise. (Formerly PHYAN 163)

Units: 3

BIOL 164. Hematology

Prerequisite: BIOL 103; BIOL 65 and BIOL 157 recommended. Development, structure, identification, and quantification of cellular blood elements; qualitative and quantitative considerations of hemoglobin, coagulation, and immunohematology. (Formerly PHYAN 162)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 165. Endocrinology

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 and BIOL 103. A systems approach to the study of hormone synthesis, secretion, function as intercellular signals, and their role in both controlling and integrating normal physiological processes. (Formerly PHYAN 165)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 166. Neurophysiology

Prerequisites: BIOL 33 or BIOL 64 or BIOL 65 or BIOL 103 or BIOL 162. Function of the human nervous system with emphasis on molecular mechanisms of electrical and chemical signaling. (Formerly PHYAN 140)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 170. Microbial Ecology

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 and BIOL 120. Physiological ecology of microorganisms; interactions of microorganisms with abiotic and biotic factors in the environment; microbial habitats including soil, water, and organisms; techniques of microbial ecology (field laboratory). (3 lecture, 3 lab hours)* * Late afternoon, Saturday and/or overnight field trips may be required.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 171. Terrestrial Ecology

Prerequisite: BIOL 101. The interaction of organisms and communities with the physical and biotic environment, with emphasis on the biotic communities of Central California. (3 lecture, 3 lab or field hours) (Course fee, $20) * (Formerly ECOL 151)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 172S. Aquatic Ecology

Prerequisite: BIOL 101. Physical-chemical features of inland waters as related to their biology; community structure and function, ecological interactions, adaptations, and identification of aquatic organisms. (3 lecture, 3 lab or field hours) (Course fee, $15) * (Formerly BIOL 172)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 173. Marine Biology

Prerequisite: BIOL 1B or BIOL 12. Introduction to the marine environment with emphasis on the biological aspects; systematics, ecology, and morphological and physiological adaptations of marine organisms, especially intertidal and shallow water forms; pollution; utilization of marine resources. (One field trip required) (Formerly ECOL 135)

Units: 3

BIOL 174. Animal Behavior

Prerequisite: BIOL 101; one additional course in ecology or natural history recommended. Principles of ethology with emphasis on mechanisms of behavior. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours)* (Formerly ZOOL 152)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 175. Case Studies in Ecology

Prerequisites: BIOL 101. Discussion-based course focusing on analysis and problem solving in ecology. Cases are grounded in basic ecological and environmental science, but include relevance and application to sociological, economic, and political considerations. (2 lecture hours, 1 TBA) (Formerly ECOL 140)

Units: 3

BIOL 176. Field Methods Ecology

Prerequisite: BIOL 101. Teaches a broad range of field methods used in ecology. Focuses on quantitative techniques for studying animal populations: census techniques, capture/marking, radio telemetry, habitat assessment, behavioral observation and experiments, and design and logistics of field experiments. (2 lecture; 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $25) (Formerly ECOL 141)

Units: 3

BIOL 178. Systematic Biology

Prerequisite: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B; BIOL 102 and BIOL 103 recommended. Modern theory and methods of phylogenetic analysis applied to the study of biodiversity and evolution. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Formerly ECOL 174)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 181. Seminar in Cellular and Molecular Biology

Prerequisites: BIOL 150 may be co-requisite or permission of instructor. Trends and breakthroughs in cellular and molecular biology accessed through the primary literature. (1 seminar hour) (Formerly GENET 170)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 185T. Protozoology

Units: 3

BIOL 189T. Topics in Biology

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Investigation of selected areas in the field of biology. (Lecture and/or laboratory)

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 6 units

BIOL 189T. Science of Addiction

This course will introduce students to what exactly is "addiction". Basic brain anatomy and physiology will be discussed as it pertains to addiction. The course will discuss all addictions (e.g., drugs, alcohol, sex, gambling, etc.) and how addiction alters brain chemistry. The Twelve Steps of Recovery will be introduced and explained as well as steps to recovery. The goal is bring a level of mature understanding of addiction is.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

BIOL 189T. The Biology of Cancer

Prerequisites: BIOL 103. An examination of the environmental causes of cancer, the underlying genetic and cellular changes that lead to a cancer diagnosis, and new strategies for treatments.

Units: 3

BIOL 189T. Biology Colloquium

The aim of the Biology Colloquium is to expose undergraduate students to selected topics in biology. Speakers within the department and outside the department and university will address topics in their speciality.

Units: 1

BIOL 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement - Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 204. Biology of Speciation

Prerequisites: BIOSC 140A-B and 180. Evolution of the species as a unit of biological organization.

Units: 2

BIOL 208. Biological Field Studies

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Integrated studies or specialized topics, including botanical, environmental, microbiological, or zoological field studies. Approved for SP grading.

Units: 1-6

BIOL 225. Molecular Evolution

Patterns and processes by which biological molecules evolve. Lecture topics include rates and modes of DNA sequence evolution, molecular phylogenetics, gene duplication, concerted evolution, genome organization, and application of computers to comparative

Units: 3

BIOL 230. Foundations of Ecology

Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Ideas and papers that defined ecology as an independent scientific discipline are discussed, both in the context of their time of publication and in comparison to current ecological paradigms. Time period covered is late 19th century to present.

Units: 2

BIOL 240. Systems Ecology

Prerequisites: BIOL 130, MATH 70. Quantitative approach to the analysis of whole ecosystems including data acquisition and statistical treatment, conceptual and mathematical ecosystem modeling, and computer simulations in FORTRAN or BASIC. No programming experience needed. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours)

Units: 3

BIOL 241A. Molecular Biology I-II

(BIOL 241A same as CHEM 241A and FBS 241A.) Prerequisites: BIOL 102, BIOL 103, CHEM 150 or CHEM 155 or permission of instructor. Current topics in molecular biology are addressed, including protein and nucleic acid structure, DNA replication, transcription, translation, prokaryotic and eukaryotic regulation, mechanisms of exchange of generic material, and recombinant DNA technology.

Units: 3

BIOL 241B. Molecular Biology I-II

(Same as BIOL 241A and BIOL 241B.) Prerequisites: BIOL 140A, BIOL 140B, CHEM 150 or CHEM 155, or permission of instructor. BIOL 241A/CHEM 241A is prerequisite for BIOL 241B or CHEM 241B. Current topics in molecular biology are addressed, including protein and nucleic acid structure, DNA replication, transcription, translation, prokaryotic and eukaryotic regulation, mechanisms of exchange of generic material, and recombinant DNA technology.

Units: 3

BIOL 242. Techniques in Protein Purification and Analysis

(Same as CHEM 242.) Prerequisite: CHEM 151 or CHEM 156 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: BIOL 241A or CHEM 241A. Deals with the technologies relevant to protein isolation, purification, analysis, immobilization, and modification in micro and macro quantities. (1 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Class fee, $40)

Units: 3

BIOL 243. Nucleic Acid Technology Lab

(Same as BIOL 243.) Prerequisites: BIOL 241A or CHEM 241A and BIOL 242 or CHEM 242. Corequisite: BIOL 241B or CHEM 241B. A lecture/laboratory course focusing on the technologies used in nucleic acid chemistry; specifically, synthesis, translation, mutagenesis, and genetic engineering. (1 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Course fee, $40)

Units: 3

BIOL 244. Cell Culture Techniques

(Same as CHEM 244.) Prerequisites: BIOL 103 and BIOL 104. The theory and practice of in vitro propagation of eukaryotic cells, including growth characteristics, metabolic requirements, genetic analysis, and screening assays. Special focus is on cancer cell lines with the potential for stem cell manipulation relative to cell biology culture and application to biotechnology. (1 lecture, 6 lab hours)

Units: 3

BIOL 245. Industrial Biotechnology

Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 150 or CHEM 155 or permission of Instructor. Theory and current practices of bioprocessing, including hands-on experience with standard techniques and formulation of a strategic plan for a new technology or product. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours).

Units: 3

BIOL 248. Seminar in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

(CHEM 248 same as BIOL 248.) Prerequisite: admission to the biology or chemistry graduate program. Preference will be given to students enrolled in the Master of Biotechnology or Biotechnology Certificate Programs. Reviews and reports on current literature in various aspects of biotechnology and molecular biology.

Units: 1-2, Repeatable up to 4 units

BIOL 250. Scientific Writing

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Prepare a writing sample to fulfill Graduate Writing Requirement; how to write a proposal for a research project, including language (composition for scientific writers), structure (elements of proposals), and content (literature review, scientific question). (3 lecture hours)

Units: 3

BIOL 255T. Topics in Botany

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Investigation of new fields, areas not in current courses, or advanced studies in a given area. (Lecture and/or laboratory)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 260T. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution

Application of molecular markers to studies of species, populations and natural history of aquatic and terrestrial organisms; Biodiversity and historical biogeography.

Units: 2, Repeatable up to 8 units

BIOL 260T. Experimental Design for Biologists

A good understanding of the scientific method and experimental design are key to successful research in biology. Experimental Design for Biologists offers an overview of the philosophy of science and the scientific method, and helps students establish the framework for their experimental projects. The course will guide students on how to 1) set up a study system, 2) frame experimental question and develop critical hypotheses, 3) design experiments to test hypotheses, 4) determine and use the correct set of controls, and 5) interpret the results of experiments.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 8 units

BIOL 260T. Population Genetics

This course will cover population genetics from the modern synthesis through molecular population genetics and up to new methods in population genomics. Emphasis will be placed on understanding and applying the strong theory that underlies population genetics to evolutionary and ecological problems. The course will include lecture and discussion, with emphasis on student participation.

Units: 2, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 260T. Endocrinology of Metabolism

This course will investigate how different endocrine systems interact to regulate metabolism in vertebrates. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the molecular, cellular, and endocrine mechanisms that influence metabolism at the level of tissues, organs and the animal as a whole. The course will be a combination of lecture and discussion format, with an emphasis of student participation.

Units: 2, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 260T. Advanced Topics in Bionanotechnology

This seminar will be based on instructor and student-led presentations and discussions of current literature in bionanotechnology. Potential topics include: self-assembly vs. self-replication in a molecular context, emerging applications in nano-engineering for biology, thermodynamic considerations of the molecular organization of lipid bilayers, ion channels of excitable membranes, integrated nanofluidics systems, and advances in synthetic biology and directed evolution.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 260T. Applied Bioethics

This course explores historical and modern ethical issues in order to prepare students to understand and to address situations they will likely encounter in biological research. Topics include responsible data management, publications and authorship, negligence and fraud, conflict of interest, and the use of animals and humans in research. The course will combine brief background lectures with case study presentations and discussions.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 260T. Molecular Virology

Core lectures on molecular virology along with discussions of the current literature. The course will emphasize the molecular basis of viral replication, survival and spread within a host population and the key virus-host interactions that lead to disease. The course will also highlight novel approaches of inhibiting viral infection and the ethnical use of viral agents in "dual use" research.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 260T. Topics in Biology

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Investigation of new fields, areas not in current courses, or advanced studies in a given area. (Lecture and/or laboratory)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 260T. Biology Colloquium

The aim of the Biology Colloquium is to expose graduate students to selected topics in biology. Speakers within the department and outside the department and university will address topics in their speciality.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 265T. Topics in Physiology

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Investigation of new fields, areas not in current courses, or advanced studies in a given area. (Lecture and/or laboratory)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 270T. Topics in Zoology

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Investigation of new fields, areas not in current courses, or advanced studies in a given area. (Lecture and/or laboratory)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 274. Biostatistics & Experimental Design

Prerequisite: one statistics class, preferably MATH 101. Application of statistical techniques to biological problems with emphasis on sampling, analysis of variance, experimental design, and regression techniques. Emphasis on analysis of real biological data and interpretation of results.

Units: 3

BIOL 275. Biogeography

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Seminar in descriptive and ecological geography of animal and plant groups.

Units: 3

BIOL 281. Seminar in Biological Science

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Reviews and reports on current literature in the various phases of biology.

Units: 1-2, Repeatable up to 3 units

BIOL 290. Independent Study

See Academic Placement [-LINK-]. Approved for SP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

BIOL 295. Research

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Independent research by the advanced graduate student.

Units: 2-6

BIOL 298C. Project Continuation

Project Continuation

Units: 0

BIOL 299. Thesis

Prerequisite: See [-LINK-]. Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable thesis for the master's degree. Approved for SP grading.

Units: 2-4

BIOL 299C. Thesis Continuation

Pre-requisite: Thesis BUIOL 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the thesis. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

BIOTC 275. Biotechnology Industrial Experience

Prerequisites: PSM Program Classification; BIOL 241B or CHEM 241B; BIOL 248 or CHEM 248; BUS 272; or permission of instructorInternship to develop familiarity with biotechnology business practices. Requires a minimum of 150 hours of onsite work and completion of a project for written and oral presentation. Specific placement is facilitated by the PSM coordinator. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 3

BIOTC 298. Biotechnology Culminating Project

Prerequisites: PSM Advancement to Candidacy and completion of all other courses in the program of study. Field studies, including appropriate experimentation, addressing a biotechnology business/science problem identified through student's independent analysis. Extensive written documentation on the plans and outcomes are required. A final progress report meeting the requirements of the culminating experience for a Master's degree and an oral defense are required. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 4

BIOTC 298C. Project Continuation

Pre-requisite: Project BIOTC 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the project. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

BIOTC 299. Thesis

Prerequisites include PSM advancement to candidacy and completion of all other courses in the program of study. Preparation, completion and submission of an acceptable thesis for a Master's Degree addressing. An oral defense is required. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 4

BIOTC 299C. Thesis Continuation

Pre-requisite: Thesis BIOTC 299. For continuous enrollment while completing the thesis. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

CI 161. Mth Mtl Biol

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 999 units

EHD 154B. Final Student Teaching Seminar - Biology

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in EHD 155B. Seminar to accompany final student teaching that provides opportunities for candidates to investigate and discuss variety of topics and strategies and to reflect on issues that surface during their student teaching experience.

Units: 1

EHD 155B. Studt Tchg Biol

Prerequisites: admission to student teaching, EHD 155A, CI 161 (or concurrently, depending on major departmental policy); senior or post baccalaureate standing; approval of major department including subject matter competency approval; completion of the subject matter preparation program or passing the subject matter examination(s) designated by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Supervised teaching in single subject classroom; assignment is for the full day; five days per week. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 5-10, Repeatable up to 999 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Requirements

Master of Science Degree Requirements

Graduate Programs

The Biology Department offers a research-intensive Master of Science in Biology with the opportunity for specialization in several areas of study. Among these areas are ecologically oriented field studies in fresh water, terrestrial, and marine environments; molecular, cellular, and developmental biology of plants, animals, and microbes; physiology of microbes, plants, and animals; entomology; microbiology; parasitology; botany; zoology; systematics; and animal behavior. The program also prepares candidates for teaching biological science disciplines at the secondary and community college education levels. The master's program provides a strong foundation for those seeking advanced education at universities offering the research doctorate (Ph.D.) or other professional degrees. The Biology Department has further informational materials available on request.

Master of Science Degree Requirements

The Master of Science degree program in Biology assumes preparation equivalent to a California State University, Fresno undergraduate major in biology. Students having undergraduate majors in fields other than the biological sciences may enter the program, but may reasonably expect additional requirements to produce equivalent preparation.

A master's candidate interested in pursuing marine science studies must meet California State University, Fresno Biology Department master's candidate requirements as well as those of MLML. Such candidates are encouraged to consult the Biology Department's MLML coordinator for information and to read the MLML information presented at the end of the graduate information.

There are five steps that must be completed for the Master of Science degree in Biology:

  1. Admission to the university as a postbaccalaureate student
  2. Admission to classified graduate standing (constitutes admission to the department program)
  3. Advancement to candidacy (formalizes thesis committee and research project)
  4. Completion of a thesis and associated requirements
  5. Completion of all additional requirements for award of master's degree

Normal progress toward the Master of Science degree in Biology requires that classified graduate standing be achieved in the first semester of graduate study and that advancement to candidacy be granted the following semester. Completion of the thesis and all other program requirements will normally require two additional semesters of study. Procedures for completing these steps are outlined in the following sections. Students should meet with the departmental graduate coordinator at the earliest possible date. Students are personally responsible for ensuring that all graduate degree requirements have been met in sequence; therefore, each student should read the procedures thoroughly to be sure all requirements are understood.

Admission to Graduate Standing

Admission to the university is handled through the Graduate Admissions Office of California State University, Fresno. For admission as a postbaccalaureate student to the university, a student must have completed a four-year college program and hold an acceptable baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution with a minimum grade point average of 2.5 in the last 60 units.

To be considered for graduate classified standing in biology, the following additional steps are required of students planning to enter the biology graduate program.

  1. Submit current scores (within the last five years) for the General Graduate Record Exam.
  2. Contact the graduate coordinator in the Biology Department prior to registration for assignment of a temporary faculty adviser who will assist in the planning of initial courses. Students may request the assignment of any biology faculty member to serve in this capacity.
  3. Meet with the temporary adviser prior to registration and develop an approved initial program of at least 9 units that is mutually agreeable to the student and the adviser. These courses are to be entered on the "Approved Preliminary Program" form (available from the Biology Office) and signed by the student, temporary adviser, and departmental graduate coordinator. This will constitute the Approved Initial Graduate Program. These courses may or may not be included on your Advancement to Candidacy Application; make-up classes, for example, are not included. All students are required to have the "Approved Preliminary Program" form approved and on file prior to registration. Upon completion of all prerequisites, the student must file for classified standing.

Admission to Classified Graduate Standing

Admission to classified graduate standing constitutes official admission into the graduate program in the Department of Biology and requires the approval of the Biology Department. Classified standing must be attained no later than the semester in which a student completes 10 units, including transfer and postbaccalaureate credit, to be used toward the master's degree; students should attempt to obtain classified graduate standing as early as possible in their graduate careers to avoid possible loss of units. Normal progress toward the degree requires that this be accomplished in the first semester of graduate work.

Students applying for classified standing should be sure they have submitted an "Approved Preliminary Program" form to the departmental graduate coordinator.

Admission to classified graduate standing must be recommended by the graduate coordinator in consultation with the Graduate Committee of the Biology Department. To be recommended, the student must demonstrate competency in verbal or written communication, quantitative analytical skills and disciplinary knowledge.

Competencies may be demonstrated in the following manner:

  1. For verbal or written communication, students must achieve one of the following: (1) 60th percentile or better on the verbal portion of the general GRE, (2) a grade of B or better in an upper-division writing course, (3) a score of 4.5 or better on the writing portion of the General GRE, or (4) 80% or better on the Upper-Division Writing Exam. In exceptional cases the Graduate Committee may consider alternative evidence of verbal or writing skills.
  2. For quantitative analytical skills, students must achieve either (1) a quantitative GRE score of 60th percentile or better or (2) a B or better in a mathematics class at least at the level of MATH 70 (introductory calculus).
  3. For disciplinary knowledge, students must achieve at least one of the following: (a) A score on the subject Biology test of the GRE of 60th percentile or better. (b) No less than a grade of B in the following upper-division core courses or their equivalents: genetics, evolution, either cell biology or ecology, and one other upper-division or graduate course appropriate to the student's specialty. Evaluation of coursework will be conducted by the graduate coordinator in consultation with faculty teaching the core courses at California State University, Fresno. (c) No less than a grade of C in each of the courses listed in (b) above, as well as an overall GPA of 3.0 or better for at least 25 semester units of upper-division lecture or lecture/laboratory courses in natural science.

On recommendation, students will be assigned to one of the following two categories:

  1. Classified graduate standing will be assigned to students meeting the standards in verbal written communication, quantitative analytical skills, and disciplinary knowledge.
  2. Conditional classified standing will be assigned to students meeting a majority of the classification standards yet having specific identifiable deficiencies that may be easily corrected within two semesters. While this classification gives students the opportunity to remedy identified deficiencies, those remedial courses taken to correct deficiencies may not be applied to the graduate program.

Students recommended for classified graduate standing may proceed with the completion of requirements for advancement to candidacy, the next step in the graduate program. Students granted conditional classified status will not have been admitted to the graduate program in biology and must remedy their deficiencies in order to be recommended for classified standing. The graduate coordinator will provide further information on how this may be accomplished.

When any requirements for a change in graduate standing have been completed, the student must see the graduate coordinator and file appropriate forms with the graduate division.

Advancement to Candidacy

Acceptance to classified graduate standing indicates that the student's academic background and perceived ability are sufficiently high to merit admission into the biology graduate program. Advancement to candidacy signifies that the student has developed a coherent program of study for the Master of Science degree that meets with the approval of the Biology Department. Advancement to candidacy requires passing the Graduate Student Writing Requirement, the establishment of the Thesis Committee, identification of the thesis topic, and the approval of all coursework that must fit within the following framework:

Courses in 200-series (17 units)
Electives (May be 100- or 200-series) (9 units)
Thesis (BIOL 299) (4 units)
Total (30 units)

No less than 18 units of the approved coursework must be in the biological sciences. Nine units must be completed prior to advancement to candidacy. The Biology Department also requires that at least 10 units of approved coursework be completed after advancement to candidacy.

Units completed during the semester that advancement is achieved will be considered to have been completed after advancement to candidacy. Before students may advance to candidacy, they must satisfactorily complete the Biology Department Graduate Student Writing Requirement. Students must submit a formal paper demonstrating writing skill at the graduate level. This graduate-level paper may be a research proposal, a literature review in their field, a paper from a graduate directed research project, or another paper. Detailed writing requirement regulations are available from the departmental graduate coordinator. Normal degree progress requires that advancement to candidacy be achieved in the semester following admission to classified standing. A student must be advanced to candidacy, possess a GPA of 3.0 or better, and file a Thesis Committee Assignment Form before enrolling in thesis (BIOL 299).

A complete list of the steps required for advancement to candidacy is available from the departmental graduate coordinator or at www.fresnostate.edu/biology/Graduate/default.htm.

Completion of a Thesis

The Master of Science in Biology requires completion of a research thesis (BIOL 299). The thesis must show originality, appropriate organization, clarity of purpose, critical analysis, and accuracy and completeness of documentation where needed. Critical and independent thinking are required. The finished thesis must meet standards appropriate for publication in the scholarly journals of the field. A colloquium is required of all students at least seven days prior to the last day of instruction of the spring or fall semester, or by June 30 of the summer session. Additional information and regulations on the colloquium and on thesis completion are available from the department's graduate coordinator.

Completion of All Requirements for Award of Master of Science Degree in Biology

In addition to the above requirements, in order to receive the Master of Science in Biology the student must:

  1. Maintain a GPA of 3.0 or better in all graduate coursework undertaken from the date of embarking on the first course of the approved program. Students wishing to explore other academic areas without jeopardizing this grade point average should attempt to use the CR/NC grade option for this purpose.
  2. File an application for the granting of the Master of Science degree and pay the diploma fee. Applications should be submitted during the first two weeks of the semester (or the first week of a summer session) in which the degree is to be completed and are available from the Division of Graduate Studies, Haak Center, Library 4140, West Wing.

Master of Science in Marine Science Degree Requirements

This degree program to be offered as an interdepartmental degree in cooperation with Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML) provides the opportunity for students to acquire a practical and theoretical education in the marine sciences to prepare them for careers as marine specialists, scientists, and teachers. The program at Moss Landing provides extensive field and laboratory work for advanced study in the marine sciences, which is not duplicated on individual CSU campuses.

The Master of Science in Marine Science degree program is administered through MLML and a consortium campus with emphasis on biology, geology, or other departments, depending on the choice of the student. Application to Moss Landing Marine Laboratory (MLML) requires separate applications to both MLML and a consortium campus. The deadlines for each application may differ. The prospective student must meet the entrance requirements for the home campus department and will be accepted into classified or conditionally classified status by normal procedures at that campus (see previous information for biology procedures summary). Conditionally classified students must become classified by home campus procedures. MLML may impose additional requirements for classification.

The graduate writing requirement will be fulfilled according to the regulations set by the host campus, and must be met prior to advancement to candidacy. Please contact the Biology Department graduate coordinator for details.

The Thesis Committee will be composed of at least three members, including one faculty member from MLML (who is ordinarily the thesis adviser) and, at the discretion of the home campus, a representative of that campus. The other member or members of the Thesis Committee may be from MLML, the home campus, or elsewhere with the approval of the thesis adviser.

Additional MLML Degree Requirements Including Coursework.

A student becomes eligible for the master's degree in marine science after the following requirements have been satisfied:

Courses in 100-series (requires any three of the following five courses: MSCI 103, MSCI 141, MSCI 142, MSCI 143, MSCI 144) (12 units)

Courses in 200-series (including 2 units of MSCI 285T and 4 units of MSCI 299) (15 units)

Electives (course[s] in the 100- and/or 200-series) approved by Thesis Committee (3 units)

Total (30 units)

Note: Quantitative Marine Science, MSCI 104, does not count toward the degree.

Upper-Division Course Numbers

Biology Department upper-division course numbers provide information on course level. Courses with higher numbers have more prerequisites. Courses with numbers less than 120 are not intended for use on biology majors. Numbers in the range 120 to 149 are third year courses requiring only lower-division prerequisites; 150 to 169 courses require some part of the upper-division core as prerequisite; and course numbers 170 or greater are more specialized fourth year courses.

Faculty

Faculty expertise spans the range of biology from the molecular to the ecological, with a broad representation of taxonomic specialties. Laboratories in upper-division majors' courses are taught by faculty, and individualized student/faculty research participation through independent study is strongly encouraged.

Faculty members have garnered independent research funding from various agencies including the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Environmental Protection Agency, and National Sea Grant. Faculty and students also participate in collaborative studies on, for example, medical and clinical topics with local physicians and hospitals; agricultural topics with University of California Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center and the U.S.D.A.-Agricultural Research Service San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center in Fresno/Parlier; ecological and environmental topics with California Department of Fish and Wildlife, U.S. Forest Service and Endangered Species Recovery Project; and science educational topics with regional school districts and state and national credentialing agencies.

Name Degree Email Phone
Andrews, David M Doctorate of Education davidan@csufresno.edu 559.278.5174
Banuelos, Gary S Doctor of Philosophy gbanuelos@csufresno.edu
Blumenshine, Steven C Doctor of Philosophy sblumens@csufresno.edu 559.278.8770
Bush, Jason A Doctor of Philosophy jbush@csufresno.edu 559.278.2068
Calderon-Urrea, Alejandro Doctor of Philosophy calalea@csufresno.edu 559.278.4080
Chooljian, Karen M Master of Science kachooljian@csufresno.edu 559.278.2497
Constable, John V Doctor of Philosophy jconstable@csufresno.edu 559.278.2410
Constable, Julie L Doctor of Philosophy juconstable@csufresno.edu 559.278.2001
Costa, Justin A Bachelor of Science justincosta@csufresno.edu
Crosbie, Paul R Doctor of Philosophy pcrosbie@csufresno.edu 559.278.2074
Gousset, Karine Doctor of Philosophy kgousset@csufresno.edu 559.278.5802
Harding, Ethelynda E Doctor of Philosophy lyndah@csufresno.edu 559.278.2001
Hussain, M. D
Katti, Madhusudan V Doctor of Philosophy mkatti@csufresno.edu 559.278.2460
Kern, Ruth A Doctor of Philosophy rakern@csufresno.edu 559.278.4075
Khalili, Setareh Master of Science skhalili@csufresno.edu
Kovacs, Shirley A Doctor of Philosophy shirleyk@csufresno.edu 559.278.2389
Lent, David D Doctor of Philosophy dlent@csufresno.edu 559.278.3966
Lin, Joseph Y Master of Science jlin@csufresno.edu
Linman, Lynn C Master of Arts llinman@csufresno.edu
Magie, Craig R Doctor of Philosophy cmagie@csufresno.edu 559.278.4074
McFrederick, Quinn S Doctor of Philosophy qmcfrederick@csufresno.edu 559.278.2559
Mcclelland, Angela M Master of Science amcclelland@csufresno.edu
Menefee, Whitney M Master of Science wmenefee@csufresno.edu
Muller, Ulrike Doctor of Philosophy umuller@csufresno.edu 559.278.2532
Rawat, Mamta Doctor of Philosophy mrawat@csufresno.edu 559.278.2003
Riley, Larry G Doctor of Philosophy lriley@csufresno.edu 559.278.2997
Ross, Joseph A Doctor of Philosophy jross@csufresno.edu 559.278.4076
Schreiber, Frederick E Doctor of Philosophy freds@csufresno.edu 559.278.8756
Sidhu, Gurmel S Doctor of Philosophy gsidhu@csufresno.edu
Trayler, William O Master of Science wtrayler@csufresno.edu 559.278.2617
Tsukimura, Brian K Doctor of Philosophy briant@csufresno.edu 559.278.4244
Wright, Alice Doctor of Philosophy awright@csufresno.edu 559.278.7692
Youn, Hwan Doctor of Philosophy hyoun@csufresno.edu 559.278.8305