Chemistry, B.A.

Department

Department of Chemistry

Saeed Attar, Chair
Science Building, Room 380
559.278.2103
www.fresnostate.edu/chemistry

Degrees and Programs Offered

BA in Chemistry, B.A.
BS in Chemistry, B.S.
BS in Biochemistry, B.S.
CRED in Single Subject Credential - Chemistry
MN in Chemistry, Minor
MS in Chemistry, M.S.

The Chemistry Department provides (1) undergraduate training in chemistry for students planning professional careers in chemistry, biochemistry and allied professions, and for those contemplating graduate work for advanced degrees; (2) undergraduate training in chemistry for those planning careers in professions such as medicine, chiropractic, dentistry, pharmacy, etc.; (3) participation in the preparation of teachers of chemistry and the other physical sciences in the teaching credential programs; (4) teaching of the basic chemical sciences required by students majoring in related fields such as physics, biology, nursing, engineering, geology, agriculture, home economics, and criminology; (5) stimulation of interest in and understanding of the achievements and contributions of chemistry to our civilization for non-science students, as a part of General Education; and (6) graduate instruction in chemistry for the Master of Science degree for students who intend to enter the chemical industry, pursue further advanced study, or who wish to improve their qualifications as teachers in secondary schools and community colleges. The multi-disciplinary forensic science degree program prepares students for continued success by integrating instruction with active forensic research, collaboration with local crime laboratories, and real world experiences.

The Bachelor of Science degree program in Chemistry is accredited by the American Chemical Society. Students who satisfactorily complete the program are recommended by the department for certification as graduate chemists by the American Chemical Society. Students completing the Bachelor of Arts degree may be recommended for certification by completing additional requirements of the American Chemical Society.

Facilities

All upper-division and graduate chemistry laboratories and support areas are housed in our science building. Eight four-station graduate laboratories are well equipped, with access to modern instrumentation. Instrumentation in the department includes: Varian EM 360 and Gemini 200 FT NMR spectrometers, GC-MS, atomic absorption spectrometers, Fourier Transform IR (FTIR), liquid scintillation counter, Lambda 6, Shimadzu, HP Diode-Array, spectrophotometers, spectrofluorometer, radiation equipment, liquid chromatographs, high speed refrigerated centrifuges, gas chromatographs, and Unix workstations for advanced computational chemistry. The university library includes many journal subscriptions in chemistry plus numerous texts and related books.

Courses

Chemistry

CHEM 1A. General Chemistry 1A

Prerequisites: High school chemistry; G.E. Foundation B4 (except for students with declared majors in the College of Science and Mathematics). CHEM 1A not open to students with credit in CHEM 1B. Fundamental principles of chemistry such as chemical bonding and structure, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, oxidation-reductions, and states of matter. G.E. Breadth B1. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours and 2 activity hours) (Class fee, $15) (CAN CHEM 2)

Units: 5
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: B1

CHEM 1B. General Chemistry 1B

Prerequisite: CHEM 1A with a grade of C or better. Acid-base theory; chemical kinetics; equilibrium (acid-base, hydrolysis, and solubility); thermodynamics, electrochemistry; selected topics in nuclear chemistry, coordination chemistry, and/or chimistry of selected groups. (3 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Course fee, $15) (CAN CHEM 4)

Units: 5
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CHEM 3A. Introductory General Chemistry

Prerequisite or co-requisite: G.E. Foundation B4. No credit for CHEM 3A after CHEM 1A. High school chemistry recommended. For applied science and nonscience majors. Composition of matter and physical and chemical changes; fundamental laws and principles; atomic and molecular structure; acid-base theory, redox and equilibria; qualitative and quantitative theory and techniques. G.E. Breadth B1* (Course fee, $15) FS

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: B1

CHEM 3B. Introductory Organic and Biochemistry

No credit for CHEM 3B to students with credit in CHEM 1B. Primarily for students in health-oriented professions; not a substitute for CHEM 8. Prerequisite: CHEM 3A. Introduction to the basic concepts of organic and biochemistry. Structure and behavior of organic and biological compounds, metabolism, and regulation.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CHEM 3BL. Introductory Organic and Biochemistry Laboratory

Prerequisite: CHEM 3A and CHEM 3B (or concurrently). Introductory laboratory study of the properties and chemistry of carbon containing compounds and biological molecules. (3 laboratory hours) (Course fee, $20)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CHEM 8. Elementary Organic Chemistry

Not open to chemistry majors. Recommended for students requiring a one- semester course in the field. Prerequisite: CHEM 1A or CHEM 3A. Lectures, discussions, and demonstrations of fundamental principles; structure and chemical behavior of organic compounds.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CHEM 10. Chemistry and Society

Not open to students with credit in college chemistry; for nonscience majors. Prerequisite: completion of the General Education B4 area requirement. The significance of chemical principles in contemporary society; benefits and hazards relative to areas such as energy, health, diet, environment, and agriculture. G.E. B1. (3 Lecture, 2 lab hours) (Course fee, $7) * (Formerly CHEM1)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: B1

CHEM 102. Quantitative Analytical Chemistry

For chemistry majors; recommended for other science majors. Prerequisites: CHEM 1B (with a grade of C or better) and CHEM 128A. Students with credit in a similar lower-division quantitative analysis course will receive only one additional unit of credit. Introduction to principles and methods of analytical chemistry. (3 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Course fee, $25)

Units: 5
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CHEM 105. Quantitative Analysis Laboratory

Not open to chemistry majors. Prerequisites: CHEM 1A (with a grade of C or better), or CHEM 3A (with a grade of B or better), or permission of instructor. Laboratory study of principles and methods of applied quantitative analysis. (2 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Course fee, $25)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CHEM 106. Analytical Measurements Laboratory

Prerequisites: CHEM 102 (with a grade of C or better), CHEM 108 or CHEM 110A, or permission of instructor. Completion of Upper Division Writing Exam or pasing a "W" course with a C or better. Principles and methods of analytical measurements of organic and inorganic substances by instrumental and non-instrumental techniques. (2 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Course fee, $25) (Fall Semester)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CHEM 106S. Instrumental Analysis in Industrial Settings

Prerequisites: CHEM 102 (with a grade of C or better), CHEM 108 or CHEM 110A, completion of the upper-division writing requirement, or permission of instructor. Principles and methods of analytical measurements using instrumental techniques. Meets off campus and focuses on the use of techniques within industry settings for environmental monitoring in the Central Valley. (2 lecture, 6 lab hours). $25.00 course fee

Units: 4

CHEM 108. Introductory Physical Chemistry

Prerequisites: MATH 76 (MATH 77 strongly recommended), CHEM 8 or CHEM 128A and PHYS 2A, PHYS 2B or PHYS 4A, PHYS 4AL, PHYS 4B, PHYS 4BL, and PHYS 4C. Basic treatment of gas laws, thermodynamics, phase equilibria, properties of solutions, kinetics, and spectroscopy. (Fall semester)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CHEM 110A. Physical Chemistry

Prerequisites: MATH 76; CHEM 1B, CHEM 8 or CHEM 128A; PHYS 2B or PHYS 4B. MATH 77 and PHYS 4C strongly recommended. Mathematical treatment of the elementary statistical and quantum mechanics, crystal structure, molecular structure, and molecular spectroscopy. (CHEM 110A fall semester; CHEM 110B spring semester)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CHEM 110B. Physical Chemistry

Prerequisites: MATH 77; CHEM 110A; PHYS 4C or permission of instructor. Mathematical treatment of the laws of thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, statistical thermodynamics, properties of solutions, kinetic theory of gases, and nuclear chemistry.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CHEM 111. Physical Chemistry Laboratory

Prerequisite: CHEM 110B or concurrently, CHEM 102. May not be taken concurrently with CHEM 106. Completion of Upper Division Writing Exam or pasing a "W" course with a C or better. Techniques of physical measurements, error analysis and statistics; ultra- violet, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; dipole moments, viscosity, calorimetry, kinetics phase diagrams, thermodynamic measurements, and report writing. (1 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Course fee, $25) (Spring Semester)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CHEM 112. Biophysical Chemistry

Prerequisites: CHEM 108 or 110A. Principles of thermodynamics, equilibria, and kinetics applied to biological processes and systems including proteins, nucleic acids, and membranes. Microscopic structure and assembly, statistical analyses, spectroscopy, photobiology, and biological magnetic resonance.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CHEM 123. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Prerequisites: CHEM 1B, CHEM 102 and CHEM 110A (or concurrently). Treatment of ionic and covalent bonding, atomic structure, molecular structure, and reaction mechanisms. Introduction to visible and infrared spectroscopy of transition metal complexes, special topics. (Fall Semester)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CHEM 124. Synthesis and Characterization

Prerequisite: CHEM 123 or concurrently. Completion of Upper Division Writing Exam or pasing a "W" course with a C or better.Techniques of preparation to include high temperature reactions, vacuum line and glove box preps, nonaqueous syntheses, solid state reactions. Emphasis on structural characterizations using instrumental methods. (6 lab hours) (Class fee, $35) (Spring Semester)

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CHEM 125. Applied Analytical Techniques

Prerequisites: CHEM 8 or CHEM 128A and CHEM 102 or CHEM 105. Analytical techniques and their applications in clinical, environmental, agricultural and forensic analytical and bioscience laboratories. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours)

Units: 3

CHEM 128A. Organic Chemistry

For chemistry majors; recommended for premedical students and other science majors. CHEM 128A not open for credit to students with credit in CHEM 8. Prerequisites: CHEM 1B with a grade of C or better or permission of the insructor; for CHEM 128B: CHEM 128A with a grade of C or better. Introduction to structure and reactivity of principal classes of organic compounds with emphasis on theory and mechanism.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CHEM 128B. Organic Chemistry

For chemistry majors; recommended for premedical students and other science majors. CHEM 128A not open for credit to students with credit in CHEM 8. Prerequisites: CHEM 1B; for CHEM 128B: CHEM 128A with a grade of C or better. Introduction to structure and reactivity of principal classes of organic compounds with emphasis on theory and mechanism.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CHEM 129A. Organic Chemistry Laboratory

Prerequisites or corequisites: CHEM 128A (for CHEM 129A); CHEM 128B and CHEM 129A (for CHEM 129B). Laboratory study of the methods, techniques, syntheses, and instrumentation or representative classes of organic compounds; introduction to research techniques by way of independent projects; introduction to qualitative organic analysis. (6 lab hours) (Course fee, $25)

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CHEM 129B. Organic Chemistry Laboratory

Prerequisites or corequisites: CHEM 128A (for CHEM 129A); CHEM 128B and CHEM 129A (for CHEM 129B). Laboratory study of the methods, techniques, syntheses, and instrumentation or representative classes of organic compounds; introduction to research techniques by way of independent projects; introduction to qualitiative organic analysis. (Course fee, $15)

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CHEM 140T. Topics in Chemistry

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Seminar covering special topics in one of the areas of chemistry: analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, physical. Some topics may have a laboratory.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 6 units

CHEM 150. General Biochemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM 8, or CHEM 128A and CHEM 128B. (CHEM 150 and CHEM153 together constitute a year sequence.) Chemistry and metabolism of basic cellular constituents including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CHEM 155A. Fundamentals of Biochemistry

Prerequisites: CHEM 128B. Primarily for chemistry majors; recommended for premedical students and graduate students in the sciences. Structure, function, and metabolism of chemical entities in living systems. (Fall semester).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CHEM 155B. Physiological Chemistry and Metabolism

Prerequisite: CHEM 150 or CHEM 155A. Continuation of CHEM 150 or CHEM 155A. Intensive discussion of the degradation and biosynthesis of major cellular constituents; energy metabolism; control of metabolic processes and pathological implications in mammalian systems.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CHEM 156. Biochemical Laboratory Techniques

Prerequisites: senior standing or permission of instructor; CHEM 150 or CHEM 155 (or concurrently), CHEM 102 or CHEM 105, CHEM 129A. Completion of Upper Division Writing Exam or pasing a "W" course with a C or better. Provides the student with a range of techniques and methodology appropriate to the study or phenomena at the biochemical, cellular, and organismic levels. Satisfies the senior major requirement for the B.A. in Chemistry. (1 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Course fee, $30) (Spring Semster)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CHEM 161W. Scientific Writing Workshop

Prerequisites: GE Foundation and Breadth Area B, ENGL 5B or ENGL 10 (C or better), to be taken no sooner than the term in which 60 units are completed. A review of common conventions and forms of scientific and technical writing including practical assignments in the preparation of laboratory procedures, research grant proposals, and research manuscripts. Meets the upper-division writing skills requirement for graduation.

Units: 3

CHEM 170. Chemistry in the Marketplace

Not open to chemistry majors. Prerequisites: completion of General Education Quantitative Reasoning and Area B2 Breadth requirements. The impact of chemistry and chemicals on society and individual lives. G.E. Integration IB. (3 lecture hours)

Units: 3
GE Area: IB

CHEM 190. Independent Study

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CHEM 201. Chemistry Laboratory Teaching Techniques

Prerequisites: concurrent appointment as a teaching associate in the department of Chemistry or permission of instructor. Discussion and practice of effective laboratory teaching techniques, laboratory safety, common equipment setups, and grading. (2 activity hours)

Units: 1

CHEM 211. Chemical Thermodynamics

Prerequisites: CHEM 110A, CHEM 110B, CHEM 111. Principles of thermodynamics; application to chemical problems; introduction to statistical methods, calculation of thermody namic functions from spectroscopic data.

Units: 3

CHEM 212. Chemical Applications of Group Theory

Prerequisites: CHEM 110A, CHEM 110B, CHEM 111. Introduction to symmetry operations, point groups and their properties. Application of group theory to chemical problems such as; selection rules for electronic, IR, Raman and microwave activity, molecular orbital theory, transition metal complexes, hybridization, and other chemical topics.

Units: 1-2

CHEM 215. Quantum Chemistry

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Seminar on recent advances in quantum mechanics; chemical bonding, and atomic and molecular spectroscopy.

Units: 3

CHEM 220. Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry

Prerequisites: CHEM 110A, CHEM 110B, CHEM 123. Seminar on theoretical inorganic chemistry emphasizing structure and bonding of inorganic and coordination compounds, valence bond, molecular orbital and ligand field theories; correlation of structure and reactivity.

Units: 3

CHEM 222. Advances in Inorganic Chemistry

Prerequisites: CHEM 110A, CHEM 110B, CHEM 123, CHEM 128B. Seminar on recent advances in inorganic chemistry. Topics may include, but are not limited to, organometallic chemistry, solid-state chemistry, nonmetallic complexes, and the chemistry of rare-earth compounds.

Units: 3

CHEM 225. Separation Methods in Chemistry

Prerequisites: CHEM 106 and CHEM 129B. Seminar on the theory, application, and literature of various separation methods for organic and inorganic analysis. May include laboratory.

Units: 1-3

CHEM 226. Electrochemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM 106. Seminar on the theory, application, recent developments, and literature of electrochemistry and electrochemical methods of organic and inorganic analysis. May include laboratory.

Units: 1-3

CHEM 227. Analytical Spectroscopy

Prerequisites: CHEM 106, CHEM 110A, CHEM 110B, or permission of instructor. Theory, instrumentation, and application. Recent developments and literature of spectroscopic techniques. May include laboratory.

Units: 1-3

CHEM 228. Mass Spectrometry

Prerequisites: CHEM 106 or CHEM 125, CHEM 128B, CHEM 108 or CHEM 110A, and CHEM 110B; or permission of instructor. Seminar on the theory and application of mass spectrometry techniques to chemical analysis and identification. May include laboratory.

Units: 1-3

CHEM 230. Advanced Organic Chemistry

Prerequisites: CHEM 128B, CHEM 129B. Seminar on recent advances in organic chemistry including reaction mechanisms and synthetic applications with references to current literature.

Units: 3

CHEM 235. Physical Organic Chemistry

Prerequisites: CHEM 110A, CHEM 110B, CHEM 128B. Seminar in application of modern theoretical concepts to the chemical and physical properties of organic compounds.

Units: 3

CHEM 240T. Topics in Advanced Chemistry

Seminar covering special topics in one of the areas of chemistry: analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, physical. Some topics may have a laboratory.

Units: 1-3

CHEM 240T. Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry

Prerequisites: CHEM 128B, CHEM 129B. Introduction to medicinal chemistry and drug discovery, therapeutic areas and drug targets, drug design, development and metabolism, lead modification, structure-activity relationship (SAR), pro-drugs, mechanisms of drug action and case studies.

Units: 3

CHEM 240T. Chemistry and Photochemistry of the Earth's Atmosphere

This course will describe and explain the chemistry and phototchemistry of the Earth's atmosphere in its 'natural' and 'polluted' states. The relationship between the behavior of the atmosphere and fundamental physical chemistry (including kinetics, photochemistry, thermodynamics and spectroscopy) will be explored. Finally, some current 'hot topics' in air pollution research will be examined.

Units: 3

CHEM 241A. Molecular Biology I-II

(BIOL 241A same as CHEM 241A and FBS 241A.) Prerequisites: BIOL 102, BIOL 103, CHEM 150 or CHEM 155 or permission of instructor. Current topics in molecular biology are addressed, including protein and nucleic acid structure, DNA replication, transcription, translation, prokaryotic and eukaryotic regulation, mechanisms of exchange of generic material, and recombinant DNA technology.

Units: 3

CHEM 241B. Molecular Biology I-II

(Same as BIOL 241A and BIOL 241B.) Prerequisites: BIOL 140A, BIOL 140B, CHEM 150 or CHEM 155, or permission of instructor. BIOL 241A/CHEM 241A is prerequisite for BIOL 241B or CHEM 241B. Current topics in molecular biology are addressed, including protein and nucleic acid structure, DNA replication, transcription, translation, prokaryotic and eukaryotic regulation, mechanisms of exchange of generic material, and recombinant DNA technology.

Units: 3

CHEM 242. Forensic DNA Analysis

Prerequisites: BIOL 102, CHEM 150 or CHEM 155, or permission of instructor. FBS 241A recommended but not required. Provides an understanding of forensic DNA analysis, from extraction of DNA from biological tissues commonly encountered in forensic practice through typing and interpretation of profiles obtained to the presentation of these types of data in courts of law. (Formerly FBS 252)

Units: 3

CHEM 242. Techniques in Protein Purification and Analysis

(Same as CHEM 242.) Prerequisite: CHEM 151 or CHEM 156 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: BIOL 241A or CHEM 241A. Deals with the technologies relevant to protein isolation, purification, analysis, immobilization, and modification in micro and macro quantities. (1 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Class fee, $40)

Units: 3

CHEM 243. Nucleic Acid Technology Lab

(Same as BIOL 243.) Prerequisites: BIOL 241A or CHEM 241A and BIOL 242 or CHEM 242. Corequisite: BIOL 241B or CHEM 241B. A lecture/laboratory course focusing on the technologies used in nucleic acid chemistry; specifically, synthesis, translation, mutagenesis, and genetic engineering. (1 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Course fee, $40)

Units: 3

CHEM 244. Cell Culture Techniques

(Same as CHEM 244.) Prerequisites: BIOL 103 and BIOL 104. The theory and practice of in vitro propagation of eukaryotic cells, including growth characteristics, metabolic requirements, genetic analysis, and screening assays. Special focus is on cancer cell lines with the potential for stem cell manipulation relative to cell biology culture and application to biotechnology. (1 lecture, 6 lab hours)

Units: 3

CHEM 245. Industrial Biotechnology

(Same as BIOL 245) Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 150 or CHEM 155, or permission of instructor. The study of bioprocessing, both theory and current practices, including hands-on experience with standard techniques and formulation of a strategic plan for a new technology or product. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours).

Units: 3

CHEM 248. Seminar in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

(CHEM 248 same as BIOL 248.) Prerequisite: admission to the biology or chemistry graduate program. Preference will be given to students enrolled in the Master of Biotechnology or Biotechnology Certificate Programs. Reviews and reports on current literature in various aspects of biotechnology and molecular biology.

Units: 1-2, Repeatable up to 4 units

CHEM 250. Forensic Micropscopy & Materials Analysis

Forensic science methods for analysis of inorganix evidentiary materials, including composition and comparison of trace and impression eveidence and their interpretation and significance. This course will cover topics in microscopy (confocal, polarized, brightfield, phase contrast, dissecting, compound, comparison, electron), impression evidence (fingerprints, firearms/toolmarks), trace evidence (hair, fibers, and biological), arson, ink comparisons, evidentiary statistics, and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC). (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Units: 3

CHEM 251. Forensic Drug Chemistry and Toxicology

(FBS 251 same as CHEM 251) Prerequisites: CHEM 128B, CHEM 129A, and CHEM 102 or CHEM 105, or persmission of instructor. CHEM 106 or CHEM 125 strongly recommended. Forensic science methods for analysis of controlled substances (in vivo or ex vivo) and their interpretation and significance May include laboratory.

Units: 3

CHEM 260. Advanced Research Techniques

Prerequisites: classified standing or permission of the instructor. Advanced concepts in experimental design. Development of practical research expertise and communication skills through the planning, completion, and presentation (both written and oral) of a short laboratory project. (1 lecture, 6 lab hours)

Units: 3

CHEM 280. Seminar in Chemistry

Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 3 units

CHEM 290. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- [-LINK-]. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

CHEM 291. Intership in Science Laboratory

(Same as CHEM 291) Prerequisites: classified standing in the MSFS program with successful completion of the Graduate Writing Requirement and beginning work with the student's research mentor on approved project/thesis research. Minimum of 150 hours research internship. May be completed at any public crime laboratory or facility approved by program coordinator. (Current employees of public crime laboratories may take FBS 290 instead of FBS 291 - must pass required agency background investigation.) S

Units: 3

CHEM 295. Research

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Independent investigations of an advanced character for the graduate student with adequate preparation. Approved for SP grading. (May include conferences, laboratory, library.)

Units: 2

CHEM 298. Project

Prerequisite: Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable thesis for the master's degree. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 4

CHEM 298C. Project Continuation

Pre-requisite: Project CHEM 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the project. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

CHEM 299. Thesis

Prerequisite: See [-LINK-]. Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable thesis for the master's degree. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 4

CHEM 299C. Thesis Continuation

Pre-requisite: Thesis BIOL 299. For continuous enrollment while completing the thesis. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

CHEM 340T. Topics in Chemistry

A professional development seminar covering speical topics in one of the areas chemistry: analytical, biochemistry, forensic, inorganic, organic, physical. Some topics may have a laboratory or activity component.

Units: 1-3

EHD 154B. Final Student Teaching Seminar - Chemistry

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in EHD 155B. Seminar to accompany final student teaching that provides opportunities for candidates to investigate and discuss variety of topics and strategies and to reflect on issues that surface during their student teaching experience.

Units: 1

EHD 155B. Studt Tchg Chem

Prerequisites: admission to student teaching, EHD 155A, CI 161 (or concurrently, depending on major departmental policy); senior or post baccalaureate standing; approval of major department including subject matter competency approval; completion of the subject matter preparation program or passing the subject matter examination(s) designated by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Supervised teaching in single subject classroom; assignment is for the full day; five days per week. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 5-10
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

FBS 222. Investigative Profiling

Examines the psychological and behavioral principles that underlie investigative profiling. Compares and evaluates actuarial and clinical approaches in constructing offender profiles. Looks at the utility and reliability of profiling in criminal investigations.

Units: 3

FBS 230. Microscopy and Materials Analysis

Forensic science methods for analysis of inorganic evidentiary materials, including composition and comparison of trace and impression evidence and their interpretation and significance. (Formerly FBS 250)

Units: 3

FBS 242. Forensic DNA Analysis

Prerequisites: BIOL 102, CHEM 150 or CHEM 155, or permission of instructor. FBS 241A recommended but not required. Provides an understanding of forensic DNA analysis, from extraction of DNA from biological tissues commonly encountered in forensic practice through typing and interpretation of profiles obtained to the presentation of these types of data in courts of law. (Formerly FBS 252)

Units: 3

FBS 251. Forensic Drug Chemistry and Toxicology

(FBS 251 same as CHEM 251) Prerequisites: CHEM 128B, CHEM 129A, and CHEM 102 or CHEM 105, or persmission of instructor. CHEM 106 or CHEM 125 strongly recommended. Forensic science methods for analysis of controlled substances (in vivo or ex vivo) and their interpretation and significance May include laboratory.

Units: 3

FBS 262. Human Identification

Prerequisites: FBS 205. Various technologies for human identification. Value and reliability of methods used for identification through physical evidence at crime scenes and related events. Case studies and key concepts.

Units: 3

FBS 269. Forensic Anthropology

Knowledge of osteological techniques to aid in the analysis of decomposed or skeletonized remains of human origin to identify unknown individuals. Covers field of forensic anthropology, recovery techniques of human remains, and the development of biological profiles.

Units: 3

FBS 271. Scientific Evidence

Fundamental principles pertaining to the laws of evidence and seminal case law; standards of admissibility of scientific evidence. Legal environment and purpose of expert testimony. Fundamental principles of philosophy of science and statistics related to court decision-making on evidence admissibility.

Units: 3

FBS 272. Expert Witness Testimony

Explores role of the expert witness in the courtroom and in litigation. Studies legal standards of admissability, such as scientific research on expert testimony. Probes ethical challenges related to adversarial advocacy.

Units: 3

FBS 274. Topics in Forensic Science

Specific methods of analysis in contemporary forensic science. Current and future forensic science practice. Recent advances in pure and applied research. Theoretical concepts in current practice.

Units: 3

FBS 280. Forensic Science Seminar

(Same as CHEM 280.) Prerequisites: graduate students only. Admission into MSFS program or permission of instructor. Discussion and presentation of current topics and literature in forensic science.

Units: 1

FBS 290. Independent Study

Gives students experience in planning a course of study on their own initiative under departmental supervision. Deals with special interest not covered in regular courses or explores a regular class subject in greater depth.

Units: 1-3

FBS 291. Intership in Science Laboratory

(Same as CHEM 291) Prerequisites: classified standing in the MSFS program with successful completion of the Graduate Writing Requirement and beginning work with the student's research mentor on approved project/thesis research. Minimum of 150 hours research internship. May be completed at any public crime laboratory or facility approved by program coordinator. (Current employees of public crime laboratories may take FBS 290 instead of FBS 291 - must pass required agency background investigation.) S

Units: 3

FBS 292. Readings in Forensic & Behavioral Sciences

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Individually directed readings in an area of special concern to the student's graduate program; appropriate written reports and evaluation required; individual student conferences.

Units: 3

FBS 295. Research

Prerequisite: permission of intructor. Independent investigations of an advanced character for the graduate student with adequate preparation. Approved for RP grading. (May inlcude conferences, laboratory, library.)

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 6 units

FBS 298. Project

Prerequisites: See Criteria for Thesis and Project. Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable project for the master's degree. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 6 units

FBS 298C. Project Continuation

Pre-requisite: Project 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the project. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

FBS 299. Thesis

Prerequisite: See Criteria for Thesis and Project. Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable thesis for the master's degree. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 6 units

Requirements

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

The Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry is intended primarily for those students who plan to take extensive coursework in other areas in addition to chemistry. This degree is suitable for prehealth professional students (premedical, predental, etc.), secondary school teaching credential students, and biochemistry students oriented toward biotechnology, forensic science, and the health professions. This degree is NOT intended for students who anticipate a career in chemistry, or who expect to continue their education in pursuit of graduate degrees.

Note: Chemistry majors may not take courses listed in category A or B below for CR/NC grades.

A. The B.A. Chemistry Major requirements (38 units)
Core Program
CHEM 1A, 1B, 102, 108, 128A, 128B, 129A, 129B, 155A**, 155B***, 156 (38 units)

B. Additional requirements (32-39 units)
BIOL 1A, 1B, 1BL (9 units)
Elect 7 units from BIOL 102, 103, 104, 120 or other approved courses (7 units)
MATH 75, 76 (MATH 77 strongly recommended) (8-12 units)
PHYS 2A, 2B (or PHYS 4A, 4AL, 4B, 4BL, 4C strongly recommended) (8-11 units)

C. Remaining General Education requirements* (42 units)

D. Electives and remaining degree requirements (8 units)
(See Degree Requirements); may be used toward a double major or minor.

Total (120 units)

* Of the 51 required General Education units, 9 units will be satisfied by the following courses in the major and additional requirements: 3 units of CHEM 1A or PHYS 2A in G.E. Breadth B1; 3 units of BIOL 1A in G.E. Breadth B2; and 3 units MATH 75 in G.E. Foundation B4. Consult the department chair or faculty adviser for additional details.

The following is an example of a four-year program for the B.A. in Chemistry.

First Semester - Fall
CHEM 1A (5 units)
MATH 75 (4 units)
ENGL 5B or 10 (3 units)
General Education (3 units)
Total (15 units)

Second Semester - Spring
CHEM 1B (5 units)
MATH 76 (4 units)
PHYS 2A or 4A, 4AL (4 units)
General Education (3 units)
Total (16 units)

Third Semester - Fall
CHEM 128A (3 units)
CHEM 129A (2 units)
PHYS 2B or 4B, 4BL (4 units)
BIOL 1A (4 units)
General Education (3 units)
Total (16 units)

Fourth Semester - Spring
CHEM 128B (3 units)
CHEM 102 (5 units)
BIOL 1B, BIOL 1BL (5 units)
Electives or General Education (3 units)
Total (16 units)

Fifth Semester - Fall*
**CHEM 108 (4 units)
**CHEM 155A (3 units)
BIOL 102 (4 units)
Electives or General Education (3 units)
Total (14 units)

Sixth Semester - Spring
***CHEM 156 (3 units)
BIOL 103 and 104 or BIOL 120 (4 units )
Electives or General Education (6 units)
Total (13 units)

Seventh Semester - Fall
Electives or General Education
Total (15 units)

Eighth Semester - Spring
Electives or General Education
Total (15 units)

Total (120 units)

* It is important to fulfill the upper-division writing skills requirement by exam or W class during the junior year.
** Offered fall semester only.
*** Offered spring semester only.

Faculty

Thirteen Ph.D. members are in the Department of Chemistry. Our faculty provide excellent research opportunities in analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. The broad interests within the faculty have resulted in interdisciplinary research projects in collaboration with scientists and professors in other science areas: agricultural chemistry, biotechnology, clinical chemistry, forensic chemistry, forensic biochemistry, chemical physics, enology, nutritional science, and molecular biology. Research projects have involved local facilities such as the California State Crime Laboratory, University Medical Center, UCSF Fresno Medical Education Program, USDA Research Station, U.S. Veteran's Administration Hospital, U.S. Forest Laboratory, and Valley Children's Hospital.

Name Degree Email Phone
Attar, Saeed Doctor of Philosophy sattar@csufresno.edu
Berg, Otto T Doctor of Philosophy oberg@csufresno.edu
Brooks, Cory L Doctor of Philosophy cbrooks@csufresno.edu
Brooks, Teresa M Master of Arts tebrooks@csufresno.edu 559.278.2311
Chen, Mei Master of Science mchen@csufresno.edu
Chen, Qiaohong Doctor of Philosophy qchen@csufresno.edu 559.278.2394
Choi, Jai-Pil Doctor of Philosophy jchoi@csufresno.edu 559.278.2683
Ciula, James Juris Doctor jciula@csufresno.edu
Cosio, Janice L Master of Science jcosio@csufresno.edu
Dejean, Laurent Doctor of Philosophy ldejean@csufresno.edu 559.278.2008
Fellows, Ingrid M Doctor of Philosophy ifellows@csufresno.edu 559.278.5470
Frank, David L Doctor of Philosophy davidf@csufresno.edu 559.278.2273
Gandler, Joseph R Doctor of Philosophy josephg@csufresno.edu 559.278.2103
Golden, Melissa L Doctor of Philosophy mgolden@csufresno.edu
Goto, Joy J Doctor of Philosophy jgoto@csufresno.edu 559.278.2530
Gray, Andrea D Doctor of Philosophy agray@csufresno.edu
Hasson, Alam S Doctor of Philosophy ahasson@csufresno.edu
Heredia, Katie H Master of Science katieheredia@mail.fresnostate.edu 559.278.5470
Krishnan, Viswanathan Doctor of Philosophy vkrishnan@csufresno.edu
Kumari, Yogita Master of Arts ykumari@csufresno.edu
Maitra, Kalyani Doctor of Philosophy kmaitra@csufresno.edu
Maitra, Santanu Doctor of Philosophy smaitra@csufresno.edu
Mejloumian, Panaela Master of Science panaelam@csufresno.edu
Ng, Kin C Doctor of Philosophy kinn@csufresno.edu
Person, Eric C Doctor of Philosophy eperson@csufresno.edu 559.278.2170
Ray, Michael A Master of Science mray@csufresno.edu
Rezai, Taha Doctor of Philosophy trezai@csufresno.edu
Singh, Mandeep Master of Science masingh@csufresno.edu
Stratman, Thomas A Master of Science thomasst@csufresno.edu
Tamras, Sammy Master of Science stamras@csufresno.edu
Thiesen, Kurtis E Bachelor of Science kthiesen@mail.fresnostate.edu 559.278.2394
Vue, Bao Master of Science bchennyvue@mail.fresnostate.edu

Roadmap

B.A. in Chemistry

Year One

Fall

  • GE Area B1-Physical Science
  • GE Area B4-Quantitative Reasoning
  • GE Area A2-Written Communication
  • GE Area A1-Oral Communication

Spring

  • Lower Division Major Course
  • Lower Division Major Course
  • Lower Division Major Course
  • GE Area A3-Critical Thinking

Year Two

Fall

  • Major Course:

  • Major Course:

  • Lower Division Major Course
  • GE Area B2-Life Sciences

  • GE Area C1-Arts

Spring

  • Major Course :
  • Major Course :
  • Lower Division Major Course
  • Lower Division Major Course
  • GE Area C1-Arts - OR - C2-Humanities

Year Three

Fall

  • Major Course:

  • Major Course:
  • Major Course:
  • GE Area D1-American History
  • Complete Upper Division Writing Requirement

Spring

  • Major Course:
  • Major Course:
  • GE Area D2-American Government
  • GE Area D3-Social Science

Year Four

Fall

  • GE Area E1-Lifelong Understanding
  • GE Area IB-Physical Univ & Life Forms
  • GE Area IC-Arts & Humanities
  • CHEM or Free Elective:
  • CHEM or Free Elective:

Spring

  • GE Area ID-Soc, Pol, Econ Inst & Beh, Hist
  • GE Area MI-Multicultural/ International
  • CHEM or Free Elective:
  • CHEM or Free Elective:
  • CHEM or Free Elective:

Careers

Chemistry student in lab

The Department of Chemistry offers a Bachelor of Science degree fully accredited by the American Chemical Society, as well as a Bachelor of Arts degree for those pursuing careers in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and other professions. Since Chemistry is the central science, we also provide undergraduate training in the fundamentals for those majoring in other science related fields and teacher training.

Undergraduate degrees and program certificates in Forensic Science are not currently offered. See outlined recommendations for undergraduate study in preparation for graduate programs and careers in forensic science.

What You Can Earn

High School Teacher
$56,101 (in our region)

Chemist I
$48,788 (in our region)

Source: HR reported data from salary.com as of December 2012

What You Can Do

Become a professional chemist, plan a career in the medical professions, or continue study toward a career in forensic science or biotechnology

Interesting Classes You Might Take

  • Chemistry and Society
  • Introductory Organic Chemistry
  • Fundamentals of Biochemistry
  • Chemistry in the Marketplace

What You Can Learn

  • Structure and behavior of organic and biological compounds
  • Basic treatment of gas laws, thermodynamics, kinetics, and spectroscopy
  • Real-world experiences with forensic science through collaboration with local crime laboratories

About the College

The College of Science and Mathematics provides professional training at the undergraduate and graduate levels to serve as a foundation for a career in science or mathematics, to provide preprofessional training in preparation for careers in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine and other professions or for continued study at the graduate level.

College Contact Info

The office of the Dean is located in Science II, Room 301.
Telephone: (559) 278-3936

Department Contact Information

Department of Chemistry
2555 E. San Ramon - MS SB/70
Fresno, CA 93740-8034

Ph: 559.278.2103
Fax: 559.278.4402