Kinesiology - Physical Education Blended Option

Department

Department of Kinesiology

Scott Sailor, Chair
South Gym, Room 112
559.278.2016
www.fresnostate.edu/kinesiology

Degrees and Programs Offered

BS in Kinesiology - Exercise Science Option, B.S.
BS in Kinesiology - Physical Education Option, B.S.
BS in Athletic Training, B.S.
BS in Kinesiology - Physical Education Blended Option
BS in Kinesiology - Sport Administration, B.S.
CRED in Single Subject Credential - Physical Education
MA in Kinesiology - Exercise Science Option, M.A.
MA in Kinesiology - Sport Psychology Option, M.A.
MA in Kinesiology, M.A.
MA in Kinesiology - Sport Administration Option, M.A.
MN in Sports Coaching, Minor
PREB in Pre-Athletic Training

The term kinesiology means "the study of movement," and the academic discipline of kinesiology comprises the subdisciplines of exercise physiology, biomechanics, sport and exercise psychology, athletic training and sports medicine, sports administration, physical education, and fitness and health promotion. The overall objective of the programs in kinesiology is to improve the lives of students by providing insight, education, and practical experience in exercise, sport, and physical activity. Programs in kinesiology open doors to relevant and rewarding professional careers.

The Department of Kinesiology is composed of a cohesive, creative, and dynamic group of well-educated faculty with a wealth of practical and professional experience. Students are engaged in educational and clinical research programs and practical experiences which incorporate leading-edge technology and best practices. The curriculum and associated instruction provide a solid foundation for future learning and professional growth. The program incorporates many opportunities for professional certification through prestigious national organizations and governing bodies. Students become experts in exercise, fitness, performance, and wellness.

The Athletic Training Major is designed for students with professional goals in athletic training. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). Students completing the program may be eligible to sit for the Board of Certification exam to become a Certified Athletic Trainer (ATC). The program has high academic and performance standards that include completion of a three-year competency-based clinical education program. California residents are given preference over out-of-state and international students in this and other impacted programs.

The Exercise Science Option provides a comprehensive foundation in the biological, physical, and technological sciences which fully prepares students for graduate study and professional careers in fitness, wellness, health promotion, human performance, and preventive and rehabilitative sciences. Flexible and personalized educational and career development strategies are hallmarks of this program. Exercise science faculty provide instruction and advising that is based upon extensive practical and professional experience.

The Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) Option offers National and State standards-based curricular emphasis in physical education pedagogy, movement development and analysis, teaching strategies, and application of physical activities designed for students with professional goals to teach physical education. The PETE program is a blended program that allows teacher candidates to complete specified unit requirements in General Education, the Physical Education Option, and a Single Subject Credential in four years. Upon completion of the PETE program, teacher candidates will have access to teaching careers in the K-12 school setting. The PETE program is an accredited, blended program that adheres to the standards outlined by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) and National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE).

The undergraduate Sport Administration Option prepares students for entry level careers in the sport industry and graduate studies in Sport Administration. Students learn a combination of skills related to sport and undergo a strategic career analysis, evaluate their marketability within the sport industry, learn how to differentiate themselves from the competition, network with leading sport personnel and organizations, and develop a career plan and resume -- all while gaining essential hands-on sport industry experience.

Obtaining a Master of Arts is a very effective strategy for career advancement. At the master's level, the Department of Kinesiology offers options in Exercise Science, Sports Administration, and Sport Psychology, and curricular emphases in physical education. There are 12 graduate faculty members in the department. The exercise science and sport psychology labs are fully equipped with research-standard technology. Graduates of this program have achieved remarkable success in professional careers as well as in doctoral programs in prestigious universities.

A degree in kinesiology can lead to very bright career prospects in health care, sports and athletics, education, and other professional avocations.

Activity Classes

The activity program is dynamic, diverse, rewarding, and fun. The focus is on quality experiences in fitness, skill, and personal development. Activity courses are offered in aquatics, dance, individual activities, and team sports. These courses are open to all students, and as many as 8 units of activity classes can be counted toward graduation (12 units for kinesiology majors).

Facilities

The facilities include a gymnasium; 12 tennis courts; a mat/gymnastics facility; a weight/cardio room; two multipurpose/dance rooms; an all-weather track; multi-purpose fields for softball, soccer, football, ultimate Frisbee, and golf; a putting green and associated sand bunkers; a swimming complex; and outdoor basketball courts. Modern, well-equipped instructional and research labs in exercise physiology, biomechanics, sports and exercise psychology, and athletic training are central components of the department.

Courses

Kinesiology

CI 161. Mth Mtl P E

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 999 units

EHD 154B. Final Student Teaching Seminar - Kinesiology

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in EHD 155B. Seminar to accompany final student teaching that provides opportunities for candidates to investigate and discuss variety of topics and strategies and to reflect on issues that surface during their student teaching experience.

Units: 1

EHD 155B. Studt Tchg Kines

Prerequisites: admission to student teaching, EHD 155A, CI 161 (or concurrently, depending on major departmental policy); senior or post baccalaureate standing; approval of major department including subject matter competency approval; completion of the subject matter preparation program or passing the subject matter examination(s) designated by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Supervised teaching in single subject classroom; assignment is for the full day; five days per week. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 5-10, Repeatable up to 999 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 4. Swimming for Beginners

An introduction to aquatic safety, swim lore, self rescue, and the following strokes: freestyle, back crawl, breast stroke, butterfly, and side stroke. (Formerly PE AC 4)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 6. Water Aerobics

Water exercises which will be the vehicle to develop improved physical fitness or a therapeutic role with pool activities ranging from walking and jogging to resistance activities and hydrotherapy. (Formerly PE AC 6)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 10. Hip Hop Dance

Observation, practice, and refinement of basic skills in the art of Hip Hop dance. Understanding and appreciation of dance in diverse cultures and as a fitness activity.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 11. Partners Club Dancing

Teaches dancing with a variety of partners in club settings. Covers analysis of rhythms associated with modern music and application of these rhythms to partner dance. (Course fee, $4) (Formerly KAC 80T)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 12. Elementary Social Dance

An introduction to a variety of dances. Includes the basic step and variations for the cha-cha, waltz, fox trot, swing, tango, and rumba. (Formerly PE AC 12)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 13. Swing Dance

Exploration of the many facets of swing dance for couples, including step patterns, rhythms and configurations.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 15. Basic Massage

Fundamental massage techniques; types of massage and their usage; physiological and psychological effects of massage, classical Swedish massage strokes and their sequence. (Formerly PE AC 15)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 17. Elementary Archery

Instruction in archery skills, including care and construction of tackle. Emphasis on fundamental skills and shooting form. (Formerly PE AC 17)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KAC 19. Elementary Badminton

Instruction in basic skills and techniques of badminton for singles, doubles, and mixed doubles play. Emphasis on basic skill development, rules, and strategy. (Formerly PE AC 19)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KAC 21. Elementary Strength Training

Basic knowledge and concepts of use of resistive exercises to increase muscular strength and endurance. The course stresses the physiological considerations of weight training, selecting exercises for basic programs, charting workouts, nutritional considerations of weight training , selecting exercises for basic programs, charting workouts, nutritional considerations, and the safety of weight training.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 22. Elementary Bowling

An introductory course which stresses fundamentals of the stance, approach and delivery, scoring, bowling terminology, etiquette, and league play. (Course fee, $25)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 24. Elementary Conditioning Exercises and Aerobics

A variety of floor and step activities to develop and improve strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular endurance.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 26. Shiatsu Massage

Fundamental principles and techniques of shiatsu (Japanese Acupressure Therapy); the physiological and psycholgoical effects of shiatsu; different techniques of pressure application, basic shiatsu points; and basic shiatsu routine.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KAC 27. Elementary Fencing

Instruction in the on-guard position, footwork, basic defensive and offensive skills, and judging a foil fencing bout. Emphasis on foil fencing.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 28. Beginning Billiards

Basic concepts, techniques, skills, and strategies associated with billiards, pool, and similar games. (Course fee, $4) (Formerly KAC 80T)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KAC 30. Elementary Golf

Beginning instruction on the techniques for putting, chipping, pitching, iron, and wood shots. Also includes rules and etiquette for golf.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KAC 31. Elementary Gymnastics

Basic skills for balancing, stunts, tumbling, trampolining and apparatus work.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 33. Fitness Walking

Designed to improve physical and emotional health through walking for pre-set duration and intensity. Includes benefits, walking technique, weight loss plan, and pre- and post-fitness levels.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 39. Jogging

Instruction in the basic principles of fitness as they apply to a jogging program. Emphasis on learning how to train/workout, cardiorespiratory endurance, and proper walking/jogging techniques and flexibility.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 40. Elementary Karate

Japanese style of Shotokan Karate.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 41. Judo

Basic instruction in techniques for throwing, grappling skills, and limited self-defense. Students should achieve technical level of yellow belt.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 42. Physical Training

Unique overall fitness program emphasizing strength and endurance training. Designed to tone muscles, promote weight loss and increase stamina. Course is tailored to individual student needs. Program includes running, weight lifting, aerobics, organized sports, and calisthenics.

Units: 2, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 43. Taekwondo

Korean marital art and Olympic event; emphasizes self-control, balance and coordination, flexibility, speed, self-defense, and Olympic-style sparring. (Formerly KAC 80T)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KAC 44. Kendo

The art of Japanese fencing; emphasizes self-discipline, physical training, competition, and swordsmanship. (Formerly KAC 80T)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KAC 45. Basic Aikido

Basic Aikido techniques, terminology and Dojo etiquette. Facilitate the understanding and application of basic Aikido self-defense techniques, and prepare the student with basic skills necessary to comfortably train in any Aikido Dojo. (Formerly KAC 80T)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KAC 46. Elementary Racquetball

Introduction to rules, etiquette, basic strategy, and a variety of shots, including the forehand and backhand drive, lob, pinch, kill, and back-wall. Also includes a variety of serves.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KAC 47. Tai Chi

Fundamentals of history, philosophy, and practice of Tai Chi. (Formerly KAC 80T).

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KAC 48. Cardiovascular Boot Camp

Course will enhance and improve the cardiovascular conditioning of individual students by applying the current training methodology of the U.S. Army. This class will be a hard driving, motivational and fun change of pace for students who want to experience the physical conditioning atmosphere and regimens that only the U.S. military can provide.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KAC 49. Kickboxing

Basic kickboxing techniques and physical conditions.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 50. Assault Avoidance Techniques

Physical training and practice to facilitate the understanding and application of basic self-defense techniques and to raise awareness for personal safety and empowerment. Explores many creative self-defense strategies. (Course fee, $4) (Formerly KAC 80T)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KAC 51. Self-defense

Instruction in the basics of personal defense and safety. Emphasis will be on awareness and prevention as well as techniques for dealing with an assailant. (Formerly PE AC 51)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KAC 53. Beginning Table Tennis

Instruction in basic skills and techniques of table tennis for singles and doubles play; emphasis upon footwork, strokes, different spins, and strategies. (Formerly KAC 80T)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KAC 54. Elementary Tennis

Designed for players with little or no experience who want to review the basics. Topics include: terminology, stroke fundamentals, game rules, basic positioning for singles and doubles play, footwork, and etiquette. Non-marking tennis-specific shoes required. (Course fee, $4)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 60. Yoga

Instruction and practice in the basics of Hatha Yoga. Includes beginning breathing patterns, relaxation techniques, physical postures, and concentration exercises.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 61. Fitness Development through Pilates Mat

Basic principles and techniques of Pilates mat excercises.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 65. Basketball

Participation-based course emphasizing basketball fundamentals such as passing, dribbling, and shooting, as well as basic fast break and offensive and defensive principles.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 68. Soccer

Instruction and practice in the basic fundamentals of soccer. Includes game rules, terminology, participation and competition drills, fundamental soccer skills, conditioning, principles of play, and appropriate sportsmanship.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 71. Elementary Volleyball

Instruction and practice in basic fundamentals of volleyball. Includes setting, serving, passing, blocking, rules and strategies, and practical applications of knowledge in game situations.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 73. Softball

Instruction and practice in playing skills, strategies, and rules of softball. Includes individual skill, offensive and defensive skills and concepts, modified game activities, and competitive opportunities.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 80T. Intermediate Fencing

Intermediate footword offensive and defensive techniques for foil and saber.

Units: 1

KAC 101. Advanced Lifesaving

Prerequisite: 300 yard continuous swim (front crawl and breaststroke), and a 20-yard swim, surface dive of 7-10 feet, retrieving a 10-pound object, 20-yard swim with the object, exiting the water using the ladder/steps within 100 seconds. (Course fee, $4)

Units: 2, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 103. Swim for Fitness

Prerequisite: intermediate swim ability. Development of aerobic, cardiovascular fitness through swimming. Exposure to various swim programs and practice of a variety of swimming strokes.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KAC 154. Intermediate Tennis

Prerequisite: KAC 54 or equivalent. Review of beginning level skills and introduction of intermediate level tennis strokes and strategy. Non-marking tennis-specific shoes required. (Course fee, $4)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KAC 171. Intermediate Volleyball

Prerequisite: KAC 71 or equivalent. Review of basic skills and introduction of intermediate level skills and strategies. (Formerly PE AC 171A)

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

KINES 1. Introductory Principles and Techniques for Physical Fitness Development

Prerequisites: Kinesiology or athletic training major, or by permission of the department chair. The study of introductory concepts, principles, and techniques for the development of physical fitness. Students are strongly encouraged to complete this course during the 1st or 2nd semester on campus.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 20. Fitness Development

Prerequisite: Kinesiology or Athletic Training major or by permission of the department chair. Fundamental and basic principles of development of physical fitness; integration of theory and practice. Physical performance and written requirements included. Prerequisite for many other kinesiology courses. (2 lab hours)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 25. Conditioning and Resistance Training Techniques

Prerequisite: Kinesiology or Athletic Training major or by permission of the department chair. The foundational application, performance, supervision, and instruction of accepted strength training and conditioning techniques.

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 31. Historical and Professional Foundations of Physical Education

Introduction to the physical education profession. Includes history, philosophy, psychology, sociology, concepts, programs, state and national standards, qualifications, career issues, and future of the discipline.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 32. Lifetime Fitness and Wellness

Healthy lifestyle patterns, exercise, nutrition, and physiological hygiene. Prevention of chronic diseases. Long-term behavior modification. Includes physiological measurements, nutritional anlaysis, and principle of exercise. Requires concurrent enrollment in any Kinesiology Activity Course (KAC). G.E. Breadth E1.

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: E1

KINES 33. Foundation of Sport Exercise Psychology

The study and application of psychological principles and foundations to sport and exercise across the lifespan and across activity contexts. (Formerly KINES 80T)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 35. Human Structure and Function: Applications to Kinesiology

An introductory study of principles, concepts, and interactions of human anatomy and physiology specifically related to physical activity and directed toward kinesiologists and/or coaches. Emphasis on metabolism (bioenergetics) and respiratory, cardiovascular, neuromuscular, and skeletal systems.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 38. Introduction to Athletic Training

Designed for prospective coaches, athletic trainers, and health and physical educators. Aids in the recognition, evaluation, and care of athletic injuries. Techniques in taping, prevention, and rehabilitation of injuries. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 43. Preliminary Athletic Training Laboratory

Prerequisite: PH 48, KINES 38. Designed for prospective athletic training students. A minimum of 100 hours of directed oversvation under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer is a course requirement. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 2 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 45. Introduction to Sport Administration

Examination of the sport industry, including the professional, college, youth, high school, and Olympic sport sectors. Overviews the infernal ad external aspects of sport organizations as well as common sport careers, duties, and responsibilities within the sport industry. (Formerly KINES 180T)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

KINES 75T. Topics in Kinesiology

Introductory topics in kinesiology not available through current curricula offerings.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 8 units

KINES 109. Motor Learning

Principles of motor learning. The study of various theories. Application of theories and findings in presentations and planning of movement activities. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

KINES 110. Motor Development

Prerequisites (for Physical Education Option only): KINES 1 (or KINES 20, KINES 25), KINES 31, KINES 32, KINES 35. Comprehensive study of physical, psychological and social stages of human development through the lifespan related to motor development. Students will be prepared to recognize, assess and provide feedback related to developmental and learning sequences, and basic movement patterns.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 111. The Olympic Games

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. History, development, and significance of the Olympic Games; Olympism as a microcosm of cross-cultural, political, economic, and gender relationships.Will not meet the Upper Division GE requirement for Kinesiology or Athletic Training Majors. G.E. Integration ID.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: ID

KINES 116. Fundamentals of Biomechanics

Prerequisites: KINES 35 or BIOL 33 (or BIOL 64 or PHTH 119 or PHTH 125). Study of structural and mechanical properties of musculoskeletal system, associated movement function of human body, and applied physics. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 118. Fundamentals of Exercise Physiology

Prerequisites: KINES 35 or BIOL 33 (or BIOL 64 and BIOL 65) (or PHTH 119 and BIOL 65). The study and application of physiological bases of movement, work, response, and adaptation to exercise. Environmental conditions, gender, and age considered.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 119. ECG and Clinical Exercise Physiology

Prerequisites: KINES 118 (can be taken concurrently). Foundational principles and concepts of electrocardiography, and clinical applications of principles and concepts of exercise physiology. (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

KINES 120. Planning Strategies for Physical Education

Prerequisites: KINES 31, KINES 32, KINES 35, KINES 110; KAC Area A, B, and C. Organization, presentation, and evaluation of in-class demonstrations. Philosophy of teacher preparation covered and developed through practice, observation, planning and presentations. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 121. Body Compostion: Theory, Principles and Managment

Prerequisite: KINES 32. Concepts and models of body composition. Theoretical principles underlying measurement of body composition; practical applications of principles to measurement. Behavioral strategies for optimization of body composition.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 122. Nontraditional Games and Outdoor Education

Prerequisites: KINES 1, KINES 31, KINES 32, KINES 33, KINES 35, KINES 110, KINES 116, KINES 118, KINES 120; KAC Area A, B, and C. Study of a variety of recreational, multicultural, and non-traditional games, as well as outdoor education for lifelong participation. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3

KINES 123. Analysis and Application: Rhythmic Movement in Physical Education

Prerequisites: KINES 1, KINES 31, KINES 32, KINES 33, KINES 35, KINES 110, KINES 116, KINES 118, KINES 120; KAC Area A, B, and C. Study of a variety of recreational, multicultural, and non-traditional games, as well as outdoor education for lifelong participation. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

KINES 125A. Coaching Football

Principles underlying participation in competitive football. (Spring only)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

KINES 125B. Coaching Basketball

Principles underlying participation in competitive basketball. (Fall only)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

KINES 125C. Coaching Track and Field

Principles underlying participation in competitive track and field.

Units: 3

KINES 125D. Coaching Baseball

Principles underlying participation in competitive baseball. (Fall only)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

KINES 126. Analysis and Application: Aquatics

Prerequisites: KINES 1, KINES 31, KINES 32 (with KAC 103), KINES 33, KINES 35, KINES 110, KINES 116, KINES 118, KINES 120, KINES 122, KINES 123, KINES 131; KAC Area A and B, KAC 4 or swim competence. Overview of aquatics: elementary through advanced skills (infant through adult). Emphasis on sequencing skills and water safety certification. Required to teach physical education in California public schools. (2 lectures, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 131. Analysis and Application: Individual, Team and Fitness Activity

Prerequisites: KINES 1, KINES 31, KINES 32, KINES 33, KINES 35, KINES 110, KINES 116, KINES 118, KINES 120; KAC Area A, B, and C. Analysis and application of strategies for teaching individual, team, and fitness activities. Principles, theory and practice of fitness and teaching in adapted or mainstream settings. (1 lecture, 4 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

KINES 137. Structural Biomechanics

Prerequisites: BIOL 64 or PHTH 119. Human movement: biological and mechanical bases, application of musculoskeletal considerations, and principles of mechanics to human movements. (Offered fall semester only.)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

KINES 138A. Injury/Illness Assessment I

Prerequisites: KINES 38, KINES 137. Assesssment techniques and care for injury/illness to the head, face, and upper extremity. Integration of anatomical structures and evaluative techniques to provide basis for critical decision-making in injury management. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

KINES 138B. Injury/Illness Assessment II

Prerequisites: KINES 138A. Assessment techniques and care for injury/illness to the trunk and lower extremity. Integration of anatomical structures and evaluative techniques to provide basis for critical decision-making in injury management. ( 2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

KINES 139. Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training

Prerequisites: KINES 38; BIOL 64 or PHTH 119. The theory and application of various therapeutic modalities used in the treatment of athletic injuries. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

KINES 140A. Rehabilitation Techniques in Athletic Training II

Prerequisites: Kines 137, KINES 138A, KINES 138B, KINES 139. Clinical applications, parameters, and principles governing rehabilitation techniques prevalent in modern athletic training. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

KINES 140B. Rehabilitation Techiques in Athletice Training II

Prerequisites: KINES 140A. Kinesiological factors for integrative application of rehabilitation techniques to spine and extremities. Post operative and rehabilitation considerations for returning active patients to a variety of settings and athletic venues will be explored. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

KINES 141. Organization and Administration in Athletic Training

Prerequisites: KINES 38, and senior status. Current issues in sports medicine, organization, administration, and professional preparation.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

KINES 142. Seminar in Athletic Training

Taken concurrently with KINES 143. A seminar course designed to focus on and review athletic training competencies.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 4 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 143A. Athletic Training Practicum

Prerequisite: Admission into Athletic training Education Program. Students are instructed and evaluated performing athletic training proficiencies on patients under the direct supervision of Approved Clinical Instructors. Involves approximately 250 to 300 hours. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 2, Repeatable up to 8 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall

KINES 143B. Athletic Training Practicum

Prerequisite: Admission into Athletic training Education Program. Students are instructed and evaluated performing athletic training proficiencies on patients under the direct supervision of Approved Clinical Instructors. Involves approximately 250 to 300 hours. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 2, Repeatable up to 8 units
Course Typically Offered: Spring

KINES 143C. Athletic Training Practicum

Prerequisite: Admission into Athletic training Education Program. Students are instructed and evaluated performing athletic training proficiencies on patients under the direct supervision of Approved Clinical Instructors. Involves approximately 250 to 300 hours. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 2, Repeatable up to 8 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall

KINES 143D. Athletic Training Practicum

Prerequisite: Admission into Athletic training Education Program. Students are instructed and evaluated performing athletic training proficiencies on patients under the direct supervision of Approved Clinical Instructors. Involves approximately 250 to 300 hours. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 2, Repeatable up to 8 units
Course Typically Offered: Spring

KINES 144. Field Experience in Teaching

Prerequisites: KINES 1, KINES 31, KINES 32, KINES 33, KINES 35, KINES 110, KINES 116, KINES 118, KINES 120, KINES 122, KINES 123, KINES 131; KAC Area A, B, and C. Open only to kinesiology majors with options in physical education. Supervised placement in physical education instructional settings at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Includes a variety of practical learning experiences and seminar discussions. CR/NC grading only. (3 hours undergraduate seminar education workshop) (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

KINES 146. Risk Management of Sport & Exercise

Prerequisites: Kinesiology Exercise Science Option major, or B or better in KINES 45. Examination of common risk management issues and principles in the sport and exercise industries, including contracts, torts, constitutional law, intellectual property, employment law, agency law, sport legislation. (Formerly KINES 180T)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

KINES 147. New Vent Sport

Examination of new ventures are created in the sport industries. Covers planning, self-assessment, idea generation, development and operating strategies required to start a new venture in exercise sport. (Formerly KINES 180T course).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

KINES 148. Biophysical Aspects of Aging

(KINES 148 same as GERON 148) Theories of aging, biological mechanisms of the aging process, and the role of physical activity in those physiological functions influenced by age. (Spring only)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

KINES 150. Internship in Sport Administration

Prerequisites: Completion of General Education courses and approval from Kinesiology Sport Administration Coordintor. Supervised work experience in a sport administration setting, directed and evaluated by a qualified faculty member with supervision by an on-site sport administration professional.

Units: 12
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 152. Physical Education for Children

Prerequisite: minimum of junior standing. Theory, analysis, and study of movement experiences, skills and materials, appropriate for elementary level school children. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 159. Measurement and Evaluation

Prerequisite (for Physical Education Option only): KINES 1, KINES 31, KINES 32, KINES 33, KINES 35, KINES 110, KINES 116, KINES 118, KINES 120, KINES 122, KINES 123, KINES 131; KAC Area A, B, and C. Selection, adaptation and development of appropriate measurement instruments and strategies based on physical, motor, and fitness attributes and needs of individuals and classes. Application and interpretation of basic statistical methodology. Offered Spring semester only. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

KINES 162. Coaching Concepts

Current problems of coaches in the school setting; techniques of motivation, organization, and public relations. (Fall only)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

KINES 163. Fitness and Wellness

Prerequisite: KINES 32, KINES 118 (may be taken concurrently). Study, analysis, development, and practice of health related fitness and weight control programs for various populations. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 165. Performance Related Fitness

Prerequisites: KINES 118 and KINES 116 or KINES 137 (all may be taken concurrently). Physiological and biomechanical principles related to implementation of conditioning programs for athletic performance. Practical applications. Discussion of skill and performance-related components of physical fitness. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 167. Integrative Exercise Science

Prerequisites: KINES 116 and KINES 118 (both may be taken concurrently). Integration of humanistic, physiological, and biomechanical aspects of exercise science through lectures, readings, discussions, and writing assignments. (Spring only)

Units: 3

KINES 180T. Topics in Kinesiology

Topics relating to analysis, performance, theory, current trends, and research in kinesiology not available through current curricula offerings.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 12 units

KINES 180T. Appendicular and Axial Skeletal Kinesiology

An in-depth study of the structure and function of the musculoskeletal system with special emphasis on the muscles, bones, and joints of the upper and lower extremities, and trunk.

Units: 3

KINES 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement - Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 199. Supervised Work Experience

Prerequisites: upper-division status, GPA 2.5 last 30 units, permission of department chair and instructor. CR/NC grading only. (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 1-2, Repeatable up to 4 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

KINES 222. Biomechanics

Prerequisites: KINES 116 or KINES 137 or equivalent. Study of physical and mechanical bases of human movement. Mechanical properties of tissues, relation to function. Application of principles of physics and mechanics to human movement and sport. Kinematic analysis of sport performances.

Units: 3

KINES 230. Statistical Inference in Kinesiology

Theory and nature of statistical inference; study of statistical methodology relating to the selection of the most appropriate statistical technique, and the interpretation of findings. Required of all M.A. candidates.

Units: 3

KINES 231. Research Methods in Kinesiology

Seminar in research methods appropriate for physical education, exercise science, and related professions: use of information retrieval technology; critiquing, conducting and reporting research. Required of all M.A. candidates. (Formerly P E 231)

Units: 3

KINES 233. Advanced Exercise Physiology

Prerequisites: KINES 118 or equivalent. Advanced study of biochemistry of energy metabolism; structure, function, performance and training adaptation of the neuromuscular system; effects of exercise, training and aging on musculoskeletal and neuromuscular health. fitness and performance. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours)

Units: 3

KINES 234. Advanced Exercise Physiology II: Cardiovascular and Respiratory Physiology

Prerequisites: KINES 118.Advanced study of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems related to exercise, training, health, disease, and aging. Theoretical concepts are supported by extensive practical experience in the Human Performance Lab. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours)

Units: 3

KINES 237. Design and Implementation of Resistance Training Programs

Study of research findings and established scientific principles of resistance training for development of muscular strength, power, and endurance. Practical applications to technique, program development, and competition. (Formerly P E 237)

Units: 3

KINES 238. Exercise Testing, ECG, and Prescription

Prerequisite: KINES 118 or equivalent. Study of American College of Sports Medicine Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription. Concepts of Screening, exercise testing, and prescribing exercise for apparently healthy and special needs populations, supported by extensive practical laboratory testing experiences. (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 3

KINES 241. Sport Leadership

This course explores the importance of leadership in sport, how to lead and sovle problems, and how to build organizations from the bottom up. The culmination of the class is a personal leadership development plan formulated by each student.

Units: 3

KINES 242. Program Development in Physical Education

Study of the current education scene to provide students with an understanding of the role that school physical education plays in today's education. Identification of sound procedure and practice in organizing and conducting relevant programs of physical education.

Units: 3

KINES 244. Sport Law

The study and application of the law to sport organizations and its implications for sport leaders. (Formerly PE 244)

Units: 3

KINES 245. Sport Career Development

Study of sport career development. Students undergo a career analysis to determine their current market value, build a personal brand, and develop a strategic sport career plan to differentiate themselves from others in the sport industry. (Formerly KINES 250T).

Units: 3

KINES 246. Sport Revenue Streams

Examination of sport revenue streams, with emphasis on how to increase revenue via sport fundraising, sales, sponsorshop, promotion, and licensing. (Formerly KINES 250T).

Units: 3

KINES 250T. Topics in Kinesiology

Advanced studies in theoretical research in selected topics. (Formerly P E 250T)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

KINES 261. Professional Ethics

Examination of ethical issues, practices, and values in sport. Emphasis on developing professional values in relation to one's chosen profession.

Units: 3

KINES 262. Social Implications of Sport

Cultural and social factors related to play, games, and athletic contests; social parameters in the conduct and management of school athletic programs; emphasis on research studies. (Formerly P E 262)

Units: 3

KINES 263. Psychology of Sport: Mental Training

An examination of the concepts in sports psychology, motivational variables, emotional states and personality variables; mental states, behavioral techniques and strategies; and issues in sports psychology. (Formerly P E 263)

Units: 3

KINES 264. Psychology of Coaching: Talent Development

Examination of psychological components of the coaching and talent development. Explores coaching development, coaching models, as well as strategies for dealing with athletes and different coaching contexts. Discussion of talent development theories including influence of genetic and environmental factors.(Formerly KINES 250T)

Units: 3

KINES 265. Psychobiology of Sport and Exercise

Investigation of the relationship between sport, exercies, physical activity and anxiety, arousal, burnout, causal attributions, cognitive functioning, exercise adherence, group cohesion, mood states, motivation, negative behavior, personality, public health, quality of life, self-confidence, and youth development.

Units: 3

KINES 266. Psychology of Injury in Sport and Physical Activity

An examination of psychological theories and applied considerations related to injuries and the subsequent rehabilitation of the physically active.

Units: 3

KINES 285. Internship in Kinesiology

Work experience within the physical education, health-fitness industry, or sport administration setting, directed and evaluated by a qualified faculty member with appropriate supervision by an on-site professional. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 3-6

KINES 290. Independent Study

See Academic Placement - [-LINK-]. Approved for SP grading. (Formerly P E 290)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

KINES 298. Project

Prerequisite: See [-LINK-]. Preparation, completion, submission, and/or demonstration of an original project. Creativity shall be a prime factor. Abstract required, e.g., choreograph gymnastic performance, organize square/folk dance program, compose audiovisual representation of sport forms. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 3-6

KINES 298C. Project Continuation

Pre-requisite: Project KINES 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the project. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

KINES 299. Thesis

Prerequisite: See [-LINK-]. Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable thesis for the master's degree. Approved for SP grading. (Formerly P E 299)

Units: 2-6

KINES 299C. Thesis Continuation

Pre-requisite: Thesis KINES 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the thesis. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

Requirements

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements

Kinesiology Major

Major requirements (47-85 units)
(Combined core and option requirements.)

Core Program (15 units)
(required of all options)
KINES 1, 32*, 33, 116, 118

Physical Education Teacher Education Option (32-35 units)**
KINES 31, 35 (or BIOL 33), 110, 120, 122, 123, 126, 131, 144, 159
Select one from: KAC 40, 41, 43, 44, 47, 49, 50
Select one from: KAC 10, 12, 13; DANCE 115, 117A, 155A, 158A; CLAS 107

Sport Administration Option (54 units)
KINES 45, 146, 147, 150; RA 150, 154
Select 26 units from: KINES 111; RA 152; COMM 170; ECON 144; ACCT 3, 4A; BA 179; FIN 120, 143; MGT 104, 106, 127; MKTG 90, 100S, 103, 150, 153

General Education requirements (51 units)

Major requirements (47-85 units)**

Electives (0-24 units)**

Total (120 units)**

Advising Notes for PETE

  1. Students enrolled in the PETE must confer with the department's physical education option adviser during every semester they are enrolled in the program.
  2. Students in the PETE must maintain a grade point average of 3.0 (GPA) in all blended physical education option courses (32 units + core of 17 units). If the student falls below 3.0 GPA in the PETE for two consecutive semesters, he/she will be automatically disqualified. A student that achieves a GPA of 3.0 or higher fulfills Subject Matter Competency (SMC) and therefore is exempt from taking the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). Verification of SMC and recommendation for admission into the professional preparation program are the responsibility of the department credential adviser.
  3. Transfer students must see the departments program adviser regarding an accelerated three-year program.
  4. Students must apply and be admitted to the Kremen School of Education and Human Development (Credential Program) during Year 3 - Semester 5 of the PETE.
  5. Students must also maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher throughout their credential coursework (Kremen School of Education requirement).
  6. Students may be able to double count KINES 32 with Core and General Education Area E.
  7. PETE majors are required to take KAC 103 as the activity component with KINES 32.
  8. Students are required to maintain current certification for Adult/Child CPR and First Aid.

Faculty

The Department of Kinesiology is composed of a cohesive, creative, and dynamic group of well-educated faculty with a wealth of practical and professional experience. Students are engaged in educational and clinical research programs and practical experiences which incorporate leading-edge technology and best practices. The curriculum and associated instruction provide a solid foundation for future learning and professional growth. The program incorporates many opportunities for professional certification through prestigious national organizations and governing bodies. Students become experts in exercise, fitness, performance, and wellness.

Name Degree Email Phone
Adame, Jennifer A Doctor of Physical Therapy jadame@csufresno.edu
Akers, Rosanna P Master of Arts rakers@csufresno.edu
Anderson, Tim R Doctorate of Education tima@csufresno.edu 559.278.2203
Antone, Gary T Masters of Physical Therapy gantone@csufresno.edu
Ayres, Elise M Master of Arts ekramer@csufresno.edu
Baldis, Mark Doctor of Philosophy mbaldis@csufresno.edu 559.278.8896
Ballard, Bart D Master of Arts BBALLARD@CSUFRESNO.EDU
Ballard, O D Master of Arts duaneb@csufresno.edu
Barnes, Danella M Master of Arts dabarnes@csufresno.edu
Beatie, Brigham R Master of Arts bbeatie@csufresno.edu
Castroconde, Brittany A Master of Science bcastroconde@csufresno.edu
Cho, William C Bachelor of Science williamch@csufresno.edu
Cliff, Sandi E Master of Arts scliff@csufresno.edu
Coles, Michael G Doctor of Philosophy mcoles@csufresno.edu 559.278.4166
Coronado, Adam R Master of Arts adcoronado@csufresno.edu
Demanty, David A Bachelor of Science ddemanty@csufresno.edu
Duncan, Donald C Bachelor of Arts dduncan@csufresno.edu
Eberl, Rese Master of Arts reberl@csufresno.edu
Flitcraft, Edward W Master of Science eflitcraft@csufresno.edu
Flores, Nicole J High School Graduate nflores@csufresno.edu
Gilbert, Jenelle N Doctor of Philosophy jgilbert@csufresno.edu 559.278.8902
Gilbert, Wade D Doctor of Philosophy wgilbert@csufresno.edu 559.278.5170
Gray, Robert J Bachelor of Arts rgray@csufresno.edu
Hamel, Timothy A Master of Arts thamel@csufresno.edu 559.278.6049
Hurley, Wayne B High School Graduate whurley@csufresno.edu
Imamura, Haruo Bachelor of Arts himamura@csufresno.edu
Jackson, Catherine G Doctor of Philosophy cgrjack@csufresno.edu 559.278.5166
Khal, Christopher R Master of Arts ckhal@csufresno.edu
Kinnunen, David A Doctor of Philosophy dkinnunen@csufresno.edu
Lewis-Kinnunen, Dawn K Doctor of Philosophy dalewis@csufresno.edu 559.278.8517
McAlpine, Justine J Master of Arts jmcalpin@csufresno.edu 559.278.8903
McMillen, John D Doctor of Philosophy jmcmillen@csufresno.edu 559.278.1123
Mccamey, Jason J Master of Science jmccamey@csufresno.edu
Minniear, Thomas C Doctor of Philosophy thomasm@csufresno.edu 559.278.8881
Morales, Jacobo O Doctor of Philosophy jacobom@csufresno.edu 559.278.5168
Morand, Kim I Master of Arts kmorand@csufresno.edu
Ostatnigrosh, Vladimir Bachelor of Science vostatnigrosh@csufresno.edu
Phillips, Tami L Master of Arts tphillips@csufresno.edu
Reed, Stephanie D Doctor of Philosophy sdmreed@csufresno.edu
Sailor, Scott R Doctorate of Education ssailor@csufresno.edu 559.278.2543
Thomason, Patricia M Bachelor of Arts patth@csufresno.edu 559.278.6019

Roadmap

Kinesiology

YEAR ONE

Year 1: Fall

  • GE Area A1-Oral Communication
  • GE Area A2-Written Communication
  • GE Area D3-Social Science
  • Ag Bus Foundation Course - Ag Sci Elective
  • Ag Bus Foundation Course - Ag Sci Elective

Year 1: Spring

  • GE Area A3-Critical Thinking
  • GE Area C1-Arts
  • GE Area B2-Life Sciences
  • GE Area B4-Quantitative Reasoning
  • Business Management Base Course

YEAR TWO

Year 2: Fall

  • GE Area D1-American History
  • GE Area C2-Humanities
  • GE Area B1-Physical Science
  • Business Managment Base Course
  • Business Management Base Course

Year 2: Spring

  • GE Area E1-Lifelong Understanding
  • GE Area D2-American Government
  • GE Area C1-Arts - OR - C2-Humanities
  • Business Management Base Course
  • Business Management Base Course

YEAR THREE

Year 3: Fall

  • Ag Bus Foundation Course
  • Ag Bus Foundation Course
  • Ag Bus Foundation Course
  • Ag Bus Foundation Course
  • Writing Requirement "W" Course

Year 3: Spring

  • Ag Bus Foundation Course
  • Ag Bus Foundation Course
  • Ag Bus Foundation Course
  • Ag Bus Foundation Course
  • GE Area IB-Phys Univ & Life Forms (recommended)

YEAR FOUR

Year 4: Fall

  • Ag Bus Foundation Course
  • Career Specialty-AGBS Elective
  • Career Specialty-AGBS Elective
  • GE Area ID-Soc, Pol, Econ Inst & Beh, Hist
  • Free Elective

Year 4: Spring

  • Ag Bus Foundation Course
  • Career Specialty-AGEC Elective
  • GE Area IC-Arts & Humanities
  • GE Area MI-Multicultural/ International
  • Free Elective

Careers

Measuring athletic performance

The term kinesiology means "the study of movement," and the academic discipline of kinesiology comprises the subdisciplines of exercise physiology, biomechanics, sport and exercise psychology, athletic training and sports medicine, sports administration, physical education, and fitness and health promotion. The overall objective of the programs in kinesiology is to improve the lives of students by providing insight, education, and practical experience in exercise, sport, and physical activity. Programs in kinesiology open doors to relevant and rewarding professional careers.

The Department of Kinesiology is composed of a cohesive, creative, and dynamic group of well-educated faculty with a wealth of practical and professional experience. Students are engaged in educational and clinical research programs and practical experiences which incorporate leading-edge technology and best practices. The curriculum and associated instruction provide a solid foundation for future learning and professional growth. The program incorporates many opportunities for professional certification through prestigious national organizations and governing bodies. Students become experts in exercise, fitness, performance, and wellness.

What You Can Do

Kinesiology students move towards careers in teaching, coaching, allied health, athletic training, and/or in the fitness/wellness industry.

Interesting Classes You Might Take

  • Fitness and Wellness
  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Teaching/Pedagogy
  • Sport and Exercise Psychology
  • Exercise Physiology
  • Biomechanics
  • Evaluation of Athletic Injury/Illness
  • Rehabilitation of Athletic Injury/Illness
  • Variety of Activity Classes

What You Can Learn

The Athletic Training Major provides instruction in academic areas designed to prepare students for careers athletic training. Classes include athletic injury/illness evaluation and rehabilitation.

The Exercise Science Option prepares students for graduate study and professional careers in fitness, wellness, health promotion, human performance, and preventive and rehabilitative sciences.

The Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) Option offers National and State standards-based curricular emphasis in physical education pedagogy, movement development and analysis, teaching strategies, and application of physical activities designed for students with professional goals to teach physical education.

The General Option is designed for students interested in professional careers that are not specifically addressed by the other three options in Kinesiology. As such, students select from one of three specialized emphases, including Coaching, Personal Fitness Training, and Sport Administration.

About the College

The College of Health and Human Services offers a broad range of fully accredited post-secondary and graduate educational programs to more than 2100 students each year. The College includes the Departments of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Studies, Gerontology, Kinesiology, Nursing, Physical Therapy, Public Health, Recreation Administration, and Social Work Education.

Residents and communities in the Central California region continue to face serious issues within the health and human service environment that will require continuing generations of well-prepared health and human service professionals.

College Contact Information

2345 E. San Ramon
M/S MH26
Fresno CA 93740-8031

Phone: (559) 278-4004
FAX: (559) 278-4437

Department Contact Information

Mailing Address:

Department of Kinesiology
California State University, Fresno
5275 N. Campus Drive - M/S SG28
Fresno CA 93740-8018

Building/Room:
South Gym 111

Phone/Email:
Phone: (559) 278-2016 
FAX: (559) 278-7010
Email